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Shared Prosperity and Poverty Eradication in Latin America and the Caribbean

Author

Listed:
  • Louise Cord
  • Maria Eugenia Genoni
  • Carlos Rodriguez Castelan

Abstract

Over the last decade Latin America and the Caribbean region has achieved important progress towards the World Bank Group's goals of eradicating extreme poverty and boosting income growth of the bottom 40 percent, propelled by remarkable economic growth and falling income inequality. Despite this impressive performance, social progress has not been uniform over this period, and certain countries, subregions and even socioeconomic groups participated less in the growth process. As of today, more than 75 million people still live in extreme poverty in the region (using $2.50/day/capita), half of them in Brazil and Mexico, and extreme poverty rates top 40 percent in Guatemala and reach nearly 60 percent in Haiti. This means that extreme poverty is still an important issue in both low- and middle-income countries in the region. As growth wanes and progress in reducing the still high levels of inequality in the region slows, it will be more important than ever for governments to focus policies on inclusive growth. The book includes an overview that highlights progress towards the goals of poverty eradication and shared prosperity between 2003 and 2012, unpacks recent gains at the household level using an income-based asset model, and examines some of the policy levers used to affect social outcomes in the region. It draws on 13 country studies, eight of which are featured in this volume: Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay. The other case studies include: Bolivia, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, and Honduras, which will be included in the web version of the book.

Suggested Citation

  • Louise Cord & Maria Eugenia Genoni & Carlos Rodriguez Castelan, 2015. "Shared Prosperity and Poverty Eradication in Latin America and the Caribbean," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 21751, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:21751
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/21751/9781464803574.pdf?sequence=12
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Marisa Bucheli & Nora Lustig & Máximo Rossi & Florencia Amábile, 2012. "Social Spending, Taxes and Income Redistribution in Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1212, Department of Economics - dECON.
    2. World Bank, 2014. "Results in the Latin America and Caribbean Region 2014, Volume 3," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 20788, January.
    3. World Bank, 2014. "Results in the Latin America and Caribbean Region 2014, Volume 4," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 20827, January.
    4. Verónica Amarante & Marisa Bucheli & Cecilia Olivieri & Ivone Perazzo, 2011. "Distributive impacts of alternative tax structures. The case of Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0911, Department of Economics - dECON.
    5. Verónica Amarante & Andrea Vigorito, 2012. "The Expansion of Non-Contributory Transfers in Uruguay in Recent Years," Policy Research Brief 29, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    6. Fernando Borraz & Nicolás Gonzalez Pampillón, 2011. "Assessing the Distributive Impact of More than Doubling the Minimum Wage: The Case of Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1711, Department of Economics - dECON.
    7. Francisco H.G. Ferreira & Julian Messina & Jamele Rigolini & Luis-Felipe López-Calva & Maria Ana Lugo & Renos Vakis, 2013. "Economic Mobility and the Rise of the Latin American Middle Class
      [La movilidad económica y el crecimiento de la clase media en América Latina]
      ," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11858, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Naude, Wim & Nagler, Paula, 2015. "Industrialisation, Innovation, Inclusion," MERIT Working Papers 043, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Carlos Rodriguez-Castelan & Luis F. Lopez-Calva & Nora Lustig & Daniel Valderrama, 2016. "Understanding the Dynamics of Labor Income Inequality in Latin America," Working Papers 1608, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    3. Guido Neidhöfer, 2016. "Intergenerational Mobility and the Rise and Fall of Inequality: Lessons from Latin America," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0196, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    4. Cynthia A. Sanborn & Tania Ramirez & Veronica Hurtado, 2017. "Mining, political settlements and inclusive development in Peru," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-079-17, GDI, The University of Manchester.

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