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International Migration and Development in East Asia and the Pacific

Author

Listed:
  • Ahmad Ahsan
  • Manolo Abella
  • Andrew Beath
  • Yukon Huang
  • Manjula Luthria
  • Trang Van Nguyen

Abstract

The East Asia and Pacific region has an international emigrant population of over 21 million people, who remitted more than USD 90 billion to their home countries in 2010. The region also hosts more than 7 million migrant workers, mostly from other Asian countries. These migrant workers account for 20 percent or more of the labor force in economies such as Malaysia and Singapore and thus play a significant role in the economies of the labor-receiving countries. The aging of the population in many East Asian countries will create significant labor shortages leading to greater demand for migrant workers. For these reasons, international labor mobility is emerging as an important development issue in East Asia with important implications for the Bank’s mission of poverty reduction and supporting sustainable economic development in the region. In this context , this study analyzes the impact of migration on development of the region and how international migration should be managed in East Asia in a way that supports development goals while simultaneously protecting the rights of migrants. The study covers: trends in international migration in East Asia and overarching regional issues such as the links between macroeconomic management and remittances and the role of demographic trends in migration; the economic impact of migration and remittances on labor-sending countries and labor-receiving countries; the migration industry; and the policies and institutions that govern migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Ahmad Ahsan & Manolo Abella & Andrew Beath & Yukon Huang & Manjula Luthria & Trang Van Nguyen, 2014. "International Migration and Development in East Asia and the Pacific," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 20437, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:20437
    as

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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/20437/9780821396490.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Amin, Mohammad & Mattoo, Aaditya, 2005. "Does temporary migration have to be permanent?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3582, The World Bank.
    2. repec:ilo:ilowps:431862 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Gordon H. Hanson, 2006. "Illegal Migration from Mexico to the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 44(4), pages 869-924, December.
    4. Skeldon, Ronald., 2009. "Managing irregular migration as a negative factor in the development of Eastern Asia," ILO Working Papers 994318623402676, International Labour Organization.
    5. repec:wsi:serxxx:v:52:y:2007:i:01:n:s0217590807002567 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. International Migration and Development in East Asia
      by ? in World Bank Blogs on 2014-12-18 19:23:00

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:ilo:ilowps:488085 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Andrees, Beate. & Nasri, Alix. & Swiniarski, Peter., 2015. "Regulating labour recruitment to prevent human trafficking and to foster fair migration : models, challenges and opportunities," ILO Working Papers 994880853402676, International Labour Organization.
    3. Chellaraj,Gnanaraj & Mattoo,Aaditya & Chellaraj,Gnanaraj & Mattoo,Aaditya, 2015. "Can the knowledge capital model explain foreign investment in services ? the case of Singapore," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7186, The World Bank.
    4. Michele Tuccio, 2017. "Determinants of Intra-ASEAN Migration," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 34(1), pages 144-166, March.

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