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Games in Economic Development

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  • Wydick,Bruce

Abstract

Games in Economic Development examines the roots of poverty and prosperity through the lens of elementary game theory, illustrating how patterns of human interaction can lead to vicious cycles of poverty as well as virtuous cycles of prosperity. This book shows how both social norms and carefully designed institutions can help shape the 'rules of the game', making better outcomes in a game possible for everyone involved. The book is entertaining to read, it can be accessed with little background in development economics or game theory. Its chapters explore games in natural resource use; education; coping with risk; borrowing and lending; technology adoption; governance and corruption; civil conflict; international trade; and the importance of networks, religion, and identity, illustrating concepts with numerous anecdotes from recent world events. Comes complete with an appendix, explaining the basic ideas in game theory used in the book.

Suggested Citation

  • Wydick,Bruce, 2008. "Games in Economic Development," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521687157, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521687157
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    Cited by:

    1. Ana Paula Buhse & José Pedro Pontes, 2019. "Regional development of education as a "coordination game"," Working Papers REM 2019/75, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, REM, Universidade de Lisboa.
    2. Binzel, Christine & Fehr, Dietmar, 2013. "Social distance and trust: Experimental evidence from a slum in Cairo," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 99-106.
    3. Ngendakuriyo, Fabien & Zaccour, Georges, 2017. "Should civil society organizations cooperate or compete in fighting a corrupt government?," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 30-36.
    4. El-Komi, Mohamed & Croson, Rachel, 2013. "Experiments in Islamic microfinance," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 252-269.
    5. Mishra, Sandhya, 2011. "Strategic Thresholds and its Implications," MPRA Paper 29383, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Elvio Accinelli & Edgar Sanchez Carrera, 2011. "On Institutional Designs and Corruption by Imitation," Department of Economics University of Siena 616, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    7. Krishna K. Ladha, 2013. "Strategic Opportunities For Quality In Higher Education In India," Working papers 116, Indian Institute of Management Kozhikode.
    8. Fernandez, Antonia & Kambhampati, Uma S., 2017. "Shared agency: The dominant spouse’s impact on education expenditure," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 182-197.
    9. Elvio Accinelli & Laura Policardo & Edgar J. Sánchez Carrera, 2012. "On the Dynamics and Effects of Corruption on Environmental Protection," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1312, Department of Economics - dECON.
    10. Accinelli, Elvio & Carrera, Edgar J. Sánchez, 2012. "Corruption driven by imitative behavior," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(1), pages 84-87.
    11. Lubberman-Schrotenboer, I.G., 2014. "Dynamics of payments, conflict and economic activity : Case studies of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia," Other publications TiSEM 0bcfb2a3-bcd8-4652-84e9-b, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.

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