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Designs within Disorder

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  • Barber,William J.

Abstract

More than any of his predecessors in the White House, Franklin D. Roosevelt drew heavily on the thinking of economists as he sought to combat the Great Depression, to mobilize the American economy for war, and to chart a new order for the post-war world. Designs Within Disorder, published in 1996, is an inquiry into the way divergent analytic perspectives competed for official favour and the manner in which the President opted to pick and choose among them when formulating economic policies. During the Roosevelt years, two 'revolutions' were underway simultaneously. One of them involved a fundamental restructuring of the American economy and of the role government was to play in it. A second was an intellectual revolution which engaged economists in reconceptualizing the nature of their discipline. Most of the programmatic initiatives Roosevelt put in place displayed a remarkable staying power for over half a century.

Suggested Citation

  • Barber,William J., 2006. "Designs within Disorder," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521034319, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521034319
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    Cited by:

    1. Price Fishback, 2010. "US monetary and fiscal policy in the 1930s," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(3), pages 385-413, Autumn.
    2. Price Fishback, 2017. "How Successful Was the New Deal? The Microeconomic Impact of New Deal Spending and Lending Policies in the 1930s," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(4), pages 1435-1485, December.
    3. Michele Alacevich, 2010. "Development Agency or Bank? Vision and Strategy of the World Bank in the 50’s and 60’s," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 1, March.
    4. Barry Eichengreen, 2014. "Doctrinal determinants, domestic and international of Federal Reserve policy, 1914-1933," Globalization Institute Working Papers 195, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    5. Hugh Rockoff, 1998. "By Way of Analogy: The Expansion of the Federal Government in the 1930s," NBER Chapters, in: The Defining Moment: The Great Depression and the American Economy in the Twentieth Century, pages 125-154, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Jan Toporowski, 2013. "The Elgar Companion to Hyman Minsky," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 175-177, January.
    7. Éric Tymoigne, 2010. "Minsky and Economic Policy: ‘Keynesianism’ All Over Again?," Chapters, in: Dimitri B. Papadimitriou & L. Randall Wray (ed.), The Elgar Companion to Hyman Minsky, chapter 3, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Michele Alacevich, 2007. "The World Bank's Early Reflection on Development: a Development Institution or a Bank?," Development Working Papers 221, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    9. Belliveau, Stefan, 2012. "Money aggregates and economic activity during the Great Depression and 2007-11," MPRA Paper 37371, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Sebastian Edwards, 2015. "Academics as Economic Advisers: Gold, the ‘Brains Trust,’ and FDR," NBER Working Papers 21380, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Robert Stanley Herren, 2001. "Contributions of Howard S. Ellis to the Controversy concerning Economic Growth: 1940–1955," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 45(2), pages 85-92, October.
    12. Alacevich, Michele, 2008. "The World Bank's early reflections on development : a development institution or a bank?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4670, The World Bank.
    13. Roger Sandilands, 2009. "Hawtreyan Credit Deadlock or Keynesian Liquidity Trap? Lessons for Japan from the Great Depression," Working Papers 0904, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    14. Malcolm Rutherford, 2001. "Institutional Economics: Then and Now," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 173-194, Summer.
    15. Richard Adelstein, 2018. "Border Crossings," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2018-006, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
    16. Roger Sandilands, 2009. "New Evidence on Allyn Youngs Style and Influence as a Teacher," Working Papers 0905, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    17. George S. Tavlas, 2020. "On the controversy over the origins of the Chicago Plan for 100 percent reserves," Working Papers 279, Bank of Greece.
    18. Roger J. Sandilands, 2010. "Hawtreyan ‘Credit Deadlock’ or Keynesian ‘Liquidity Trap’? Lessons for Japan from the Great Depression," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: Robert Leeson (ed.), David Laidler’s Contributions to Economics, chapter 15, pages 335-371, Palgrave Macmillan.
    19. Sandilands, Roger, 2009. "New Evidence on Allyn Young’s Style and Influence as a Teacher," SIRE Discussion Papers 2009-16, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).

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