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An optimal assignment procedure for multiple online surveys

Author

Listed:
  • Bogumił Kamiński
  • Wit Jakczun
  • Mariusz Kozakiewicz
  • Małgorzata Półtorak

Abstract

The problem of optimal assignment of respondents to internet surveys has been considered. The task is taken from a leading online research company in Central and Eastern Europe, which runs several dozen surveys in parallel. Each survey is assigned a target number of responses to be collected and unique selection criteria for choosing respondents based on their socio-demographic data. A mathematical programming model has been proposed that enables us to find an optimal mechanism for assigning respondents to surveys so as to minimize the required total number of invitations to surveys issued. A side effect of the assignment procedure is that the samples obtained are not representative of the population under survey. Therefore, a sample weighting scheme has been developed thattakes this fact into account and allows us to obtain unbiased estimators of the characteristics of the population surveyed.

Suggested Citation

  • Bogumił Kamiński & Wit Jakczun & Mariusz Kozakiewicz & Małgorzata Półtorak, 2012. "An optimal assignment procedure for multiple online surveys," Operations Research and Decisions, Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Management, vol. 22(4), pages 69-85.
  • Handle: RePEc:wut:journl:v:4:y:2012:p:69-85:id:1033
    DOI: 10.5277/ord120404
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    3. Lohr, Sharon & Rao, J.N.K., 2006. "Estimation in Multiple-Frame Surveys," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 101, pages 1019-1030, September.
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