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Roles of government in a mixed economy


  • Richard R. Nelson


This essay argues that market failure analysis provides an unsubstantial basis for assessing the kinds of things governments should be doing if they could do them well, and modern public choice theory an inadequate guide to obstacles to effective governmental action. The argument is supported by analysis of political rhetoric and actual policy in two arenas: support of R&D, and help for poor children.

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  • Richard R. Nelson, 1987. "Roles of government in a mixed economy," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(4), pages 541-566.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:6:y:1987:i:4:p:541-566 DOI: 10.2307/3323507

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fischhoff, Baruch, 1994. "What forecasts (seem to) mean," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 387-403, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paulus, Alari & Sutherland, Holly & Tsakloglou, Panos, 2009. "The distributional impact of in kind public benefits in European countries," EUROMOD Working Papers EM10/09, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Justman, Moshe & Teubal, Morris, 1995. "Technological infrastructure policy (TIP): Creating capabilities and building markets," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 259-281, March.
    3. Richard O. Zerbe & Howard E. McCurdy, 1999. "The failure of market failure," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 558-578.
    4. Lall, Sanjaya & Teubal, Morris, 1998. ""Market-stimulating" technology policies in developing countries: A framework with examples from East Asia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(8), pages 1369-1385, August.
    5. Teubal, Morris, 1997. "A catalytic and evolutionary approach to horizontal technology policies (HTPs)," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(8), pages 1161-1188, January.
    6. Teubal, Morris, 1996. "R&D and technology policy in NICs as learning processes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 449-460, March.

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