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From policy to practice: changing government attitudes towards the private sector in Malawi

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  • Richard Record

    (Ministry of Industry, Trade and Private Sector Development, Government of Malawi, Lilongwe, Malawi)

Abstract

This paper reviews relations between government and the private sector in Malawi from independence to the present. The analysis charts the changing emphasis that official policy has attached to the role of the private sector throughout the transition from dictatorship to democracy; and from a PRSP that effectively ignored the role of the private sector in national development, to the current more balanced approach that recognises the private sector as the 'engine of economic growth' and the best means of achieving poverty reduction. However, in spite of progress, Malawi's private sector remains fragile and while the rhetoric from the highest levels of government towards the private sector has evolved, the enabling environment for private sector development is still inhospitable. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Record, 2007. "From policy to practice: changing government attitudes towards the private sector in Malawi," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(6), pages 805-816.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:19:y:2007:i:6:p:805-816
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.1403
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1403
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pauline Peters, 2006. "Rural income and poverty in a time of radical change in Malawi," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 322-345.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:ilo:ilowps:461444 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Durevall, Dick. & Mussa, Richard., 2010. "Employment diagnostic analysis : Malawi," ILO Working Papers 994614443402676, International Labour Organization.
    3. Ivar Kolstad & Arne Wiig, 2015. "Education and entrepreneurial success," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 44(4), pages 783-796, April.
    4. Record, Richard & Davies, Simon, 2007. "Determinants and impact of private sector investment in Malawi: evidence from the 2006 investment climate survey," MPRA Paper 3818, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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