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Policy preferences in fiscal response studies

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  • Simon Feeny

    (RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia)

Abstract

This paper contributes to the fiscal response literature. By appropriately incorporating asymmetric policy preferences, it derives a model that the literature has long been searching for. It proceeds by discussing the implications regarding the results from previous studies. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Feeny, 2006. "Policy preferences in fiscal response studies," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(8), pages 1167-1175.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:18:y:2006:i:8:p:1167-1175
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.1281
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1281
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shlomo Benartzi & Richard H. Thaler, 1995. "Myopic Loss Aversion and the Equity Premium Puzzle," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(1), pages 73-92.
    2. Ira N. Gang & Haider Ali Khan, 1999. "Foreign aid and fiscal behavior in a bounded rationality model: Different policy regimes," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 24(1), pages 121-134.
    3. White, Howard, 1994. "Foreign aid, taxes and public investment: A further comment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 155-163, October.
    4. Gang, Ira N. & Ali Khan, Haider, 1990. "Foreign aid, taxes, and public investment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1-2), pages 355-369, November.
    5. Franco-Rodriguez, Susana & Morrissey, Oliver & McGillivray, Mark, 1998. "Aid and the Public Sector in Pakistan: Evidence with Endogenous Aid," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(7), pages 1241-1250, July.
    6. George Mavrotas, 2002. "Foreign aid and fiscal response: Does aid disaggregation matter?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 138(3), pages 534-559, September.
    7. Mark McGillivray & Bazoumana Ouattara, 2005. "Aid, Debt Burden and Government Fiscal Behaviour in Côte d'Ivoire," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(2), pages 247-269, June.
    8. Gang, Ira N., 1993. "Reply to Tran-Nam Binh and Mark McGillivray, 'foreign aid, taxes and public investment: A comment'," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 177-178, June.
    9. Binh, Tran-Nam & McGillivray, Mark, 1993. "Foreign aid, taxes and public investment A comment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 173-176, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Roberto Machado, 2010. "Aid and fiscal policy in Nicaragua: A fiscal response analysis," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(4), pages 483-502.
    2. Jon Eguia, 2013. "On the spatial representation of preference profiles," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 52(1), pages 103-128, January.
    3. Mark McGillivray, 2009. "Aid, Economic Reform, and Public Sector Fiscal Behavior in Developing Countries," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(s1), pages 526-542, August.
    4. Feeny, Simon, 2007. "Foreign Aid and Fiscal Governance in Melanesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 439-453, March.
    5. Martínez-Mora, Francisco & Puy, M. Socorro, 2014. "The determinants and electoral consequences of asymmetric preferences," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 85-97.
    6. Hoda Abd El Hamid Ali, 2013. "Foreign Aid and Economic Growth in Egypt: A Cointegration Analysis," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 3(3), pages 743-751.
    7. Aaron Batten, 2010. "Foreign aid, government behaviour, and fiscal policy in Papua New Guinea," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 24(2), pages 142-160, November.
    8. Martínez-Mora Francisco & Puy M. Socorro, 2012. "Asymmetric Single-peaked Preferences," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-26, December.
    9. Feeny, Simon & McGillivray, Mark, 2010. "Aid and public sector fiscal behaviour in failing states," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1006-1016, September.
    10. Aaron Batten, 2009. "Foreign Aid, Government Behaviour and Fiscal Policy Outcomes in Papua New Guinea," International and Development Economics Working Papers idec09-03, International and Development Economics.
    11. Abrams M E Tagem, 2017. "Aid, Taxes and Government Spending: A Heterogeneous Cointegrated Panel Analysis," Discussion Papers 2017-02, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.

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