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Fertility in Austria: Past, Present and the Near Future

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  • Tomas Frejka
  • Jean-Paul Sardon
  • Alain Confesson

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  • Tomas Frejka & Jean-Paul Sardon & Alain Confesson, 2004. "Fertility in Austria: Past, Present and the Near Future," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 2(1), pages 35-56.
  • Handle: RePEc:vid:yearbk:v:2:y:2004:i:1:p:35-56
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tomas Frejka & Gérard Calot, 2001. "Cohort Reproductive Patterns in Low‐Fertility Countries," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(1), pages 103-132, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexia Prskawetz & Tomáš Sobotka & Isabella Buber-Ennser & Henriette Engelhardt & Richard Gisser, 2008. "Austria: Persistent low fertility since the mid-1980s," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(12), pages 293-360.

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