IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/uwp/landec/v85y2009i2p265-278.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Bounded Rationality, Climate Risks, and Insurance: Is There a Market for Natural Disasters?

Author

Listed:
  • W. J. Wouter Botzen
  • Jeroen C.J.M. van den Bergh

Abstract

This paper examines the role of insurances to reduce uncertainty associated with climate change losses for individuals. Of special interest is the value individuals place on the reduction of increased flood risks by insurance coverage. Using rank-dependent utility and prospect theories, risk premiums are estimated under different climate change scenarios for the Netherlands. The study delivers two main insights. First, estimation results suggest that a profitable flood insurance market could be feasible. Second, climate change has the potential to increase the profitability of offering flood insurance.

Suggested Citation

  • W. J. Wouter Botzen & Jeroen C.J.M. van den Bergh, 2009. "Bounded Rationality, Climate Risks, and Insurance: Is There a Market for Natural Disasters?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 85(2), pages 265-278.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:85:y:2009:i:2:p:265-278
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/85/2/265
    Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wakker, Peter P, 2001. "Testing and Characterizing Properties of Nonadditive Measures through Violations of the Sure-Thing Principle," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(4), pages 1039-1059, July.
    2. Brookshire, David S, et al, 1985. "A Test of the Expected Utility Model: Evidence from Earthquake Risks," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(2), pages 369-389, April.
    3. Donkers, Bas & Melenberg, Bertrand & Van Soest, Arthur, 2001. "Estimating Risk Attitudes Using Lotteries: A Large Sample Approach," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 165-195, March.
    4. Nathalie Etchart-Vincent, 2004. "Is Probability Weighting Sensitive to the Magnitude of Consequences? An Experimental Investigation on Losses," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 217-235, May.
    5. Richard Tol, 2002. "Estimates of the Damage Costs of Climate Change. Part 1: Benchmark Estimates," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 21(1), pages 47-73, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. van den Bergh, J.C.J.M. & Botzen, W.J.W., 2015. "Monetary valuation of the social cost of CO2 emissions: A critical survey," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 33-46.
    2. Kai A. Konrad & Marcel Thum, 2012. "The Role of Economic Policy in Climate Change Adaptation," CESifo Working Paper Series 3959, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Klaus Eisenack & Rebecca Stecker & Diana Reckien & Esther Hoffmann, 2012. "Adaptation to climate change in the transport sector: a review of actions and actors," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 17(5), pages 451-469, June.
    4. Botzen, W.J.W. & van den Bergh, J.C.J.M., 2012. "Risk attitudes to low-probability climate change risks: WTP for flood insurance," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 151-166.
    5. Krawczyk, Michal & Trautmann, Stefan & van de Kuilen, Gijs, 2017. "Catastrophic risk : Social influences on insurance decisions," Other publications TiSEM 32c55717-0cd7-46b0-8f2b-6, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    6. repec:mar:magkse:20134 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. W. Botzen & Jeroen Bergh, 2014. "Specifications of Social Welfare in Economic Studies of Climate Policy: Overview of Criteria and Related Policy Insights," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 58(1), pages 1-33, May.
    8. Elisabeth Gsottbauer & Jeroen den Bergh, 2013. "Bounded rationality and social interaction in negotiating a climate agreement," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 225-249, September.
    9. Azhar Abbas & T. Amjath-Babu & Harald Kächele & Klaus Müller, 2015. "Non-structural flood risk mitigation under developing country conditions: an analysis on the determinants of willingness to pay for flood insurance in rural Pakistan," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 75(3), pages 2119-2135, February.
    10. Jorge E. Arana & Carmelo León, 2011. "Scale Perception Bias in the Valuation of Environmental Risks," Post-Print hal-00701866, HAL.
    11. Surminski, Swenja, 2014. "The role of insurance in reducing direct risk: the case of flood insurance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60764, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    12. Amanda Savitt, 2017. "Insurance as a tool for hazard risk management? An evaluation of the literature," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 86(2), pages 583-599, March.
    13. W. Botzen & J. Bergh & L. Bouwer, 2010. "Climate change and increased risk for the insurance sector: a global perspective and an assessment for the Netherlands," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 52(3), pages 577-598, March.
    14. W. Botzen, 2011. "Alistair Munro: Bounded Rationality and Public Policy: A Perspective from Behavioural Economics. Ian J. Bateman (ed.): The Economics of Non-Market Goods and Resources," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 49(2), pages 305-308, June.
    15. Nicola Ranger & Andrew Williamson, 2011. "Forecasting non-life insurance demand in the BRICS economies: a preliminary evaluation of the impacts of income and climate change," GRI Working Papers 61, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    16. Nicola Ranger & Swenja Surminski, 2011. "A preliminary assessment of the impact of climate change on non-life insurance demand in the BRICS economies," GRI Working Papers 63, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    17. Alpaslan Akay & Peter Martinsson & Haileselassie Medhin & Stefan Trautmann, 2012. "Attitudes toward uncertainty among the poor: an experiment in rural Ethiopia," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 73(3), pages 453-464, September.
    18. repec:kap:theord:v:82:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11238-016-9571-y is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Dekker, T. & Koster, P.R. & Brouwer, R., 2012. "Changing with the tide: Semi-parametric estimation of preference dynamics," Serie Research Memoranda 0005, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    20. Claudia Schwirplies & Andreas Ziegler, 2013. "Are German Tourists Environmental Chameleons? A Micro-econometric Analysis of Adaptation to Climate Change," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201334, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    21. Oberlack, Christoph & Neumärker, Bernhard, 2013. "A diagnostic approach to the institutional analysis of climate adaptation," The Constitutional Economics Network Working Papers 01-2013, University of Freiburg, Department of Economic Policy and Constitutional Economic Theory.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:85:y:2009:i:2:p:265-278. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://le.uwpress.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.