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A Comparison of the Cyclical Behavior of Union and Nonunion Wages in the United States

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  • Darren Grant

Abstract

This paper presents an extensive analysis of the behavior of union and nonunion wages over the business cycle, using quasi-panels developed from the Current Population Survey, in an attempt to resolve or reconcile competing claims about the cyclical behavior of union and nonunion wages. Union wages were roughly as procyclical as nonunion wages were, prior to the early 1980s. Substantial reductions in union wage procyclicality since then are associated with reductions in the procyclical exercise of bargaining power.

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  • Darren Grant, 2001. "A Comparison of the Cyclical Behavior of Union and Nonunion Wages in the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(1), pages 31-57.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:36:y:2001:i:1:p:31-57
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-442, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barry T. Hirsch, 2004. "Reconsidering Union Wage Effects: Surveying New Evidence on an Old Topic," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 25(2), pages 233-266, April.
    2. David Blanchflower & Alex Bryson, 2004. "The Union Wage Premium in the US and the UK," CEP Discussion Papers dp0612, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Anabela Carneiro & Pedro Portugal, 2004. "Workers' Flows and Real Wage Cyclicality," Working Papers w200409, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.

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