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The Impact Of Overconfidence Bias And Disposition Effect On The Volume Of Transaction And The Volatility Of The French Stock Market

Listed author(s):
  • Ellouz SIWAR
Registered author(s):

    The volume of transaction varies according to several factors. Of a point of view of the behavioural finance, a high level of this last can be assigned to a phenomenon of overconfidence or a disposition effect. This paper studies these two phenomena as well as the one of the asymmetry of the volatility on the French stock market. The objective of this paper is to introduce explanations of the behavioural finance in the sources of variation of the transaction volumes. The adopted methodology is based on VAR analyses, T-GARCH regressions and time series regressions.

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    Article provided by Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Financial Management and Accounting Craiova in its journal Journal of Applied Economic Sciences.

    Volume (Year): 6 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 1(15)/ Spring 2011 ()
    Pages: 61-83

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    Handle: RePEc:ush:jaessh:v:6:y:2011:i:1(15)_spring2011:p:130
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www2.spiruharet.ro/facultati/facultate.php?id=14

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    1. Harris, Milton & Raviv, Artur, 1993. "Differences of Opinion Make a Horse Race," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(3), pages 473-506.
    2. Lo, Andrew W & Wang, Jiang, 2000. "Trading Volume: Definitions, Data Analysis, and Implications of Portfolio Theory," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 13(2), pages 257-300.
    3. Gallant, A Ronald & Rossi, Peter E & Tauchen, George, 1992. "Stock Prices and Volume," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 5(2), pages 199-242.
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    5. Jegadeesh, Narasimhan & Titman, Sheridan, 1993. " Returns to Buying Winners and Selling Losers: Implications for Stock Market Efficiency," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(1), pages 65-91, March.
    6. Grinblatt, Mark & Han, Bing, 2001. "The Disposition Effect and Momentum," University of California at Los Angeles, Anderson Graduate School of Management qt6qg5d62p, Anderson Graduate School of Management, UCLA.
    7. Guillermo Llorente & Roni Michaely & Gideon Saar & Jiang Wang, 2002. "Dynamic Volume-Return Relation of Individual Stocks," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(4), pages 1005-1047.
    8. Simon Gervais & Terrance Odean, "undated". "Learning To Be Overconfident," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 05-97, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
    9. Ferris, Stephen P & Haugen, Robert A & Makhija, Anil K, 1988. " Predicting Contemporary Volume with Historic Volume at Differential Price Levels: Evidence Supporting the Disposition Effect," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(3), pages 677-697, July.
    10. Lakonishok, Josef & Smidt, Seymour, 1986. " Volume for Winners and Losers: Taxation and Other Motives for Stock Trading," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 41(4), pages 951-974, September.
    11. Shefrin, Hersh & Statman, Meir, 1985. " The Disposition to Sell Winners Too Early and Ride Losers Too Long: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 40(3), pages 777-790, July.
    12. Bessembinder, Hendrik & Chan, Kalok & Seguin, Paul J., 1996. "An empirical examination of information, differences of opinion, and trading activity," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 105-134, January.
    13. Chip Heath & Steven Huddart & Mark Lang, 1999. "Psychological Factors and Stock Option Exercise," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 601-627.
    14. Karpoff, Jonathan M., 1987. "The Relation between Price Changes and Trading Volume: A Survey," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(01), pages 109-126, March.
    15. Terrance Odean, 1998. "Are Investors Reluctant to Realize Their Losses?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 53(5), pages 1775-1798, October.
    16. Kent Daniel & David Hirshleifer & Avanidhar Subrahmanyam, 1998. "Investor Psychology and Security Market Under- and Overreactions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 53(6), pages 1839-1885, December.
    17. Cooper, Michael, 1999. "Filter Rules Based on Price and Volume in Individual Security Overreaction," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 12(4), pages 901-935.
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