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Consumers' Evaluation of New Products: Learning from Self and Others

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  • McFadden, Daniel L
  • Train, Kenneth E

Abstract

When offered a new product whose attributes are unknown, customers can determine whether they like the product by trying it themselves or can wait to observe the experience of other customers who try the product. The authors specify a rational decision process and investigate the implications of learning from others on the sales of new products and the impact of advertising. Copyright 1996 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • McFadden, Daniel L & Train, Kenneth E, 1996. "Consumers' Evaluation of New Products: Learning from Self and Others," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(4), pages 683-703, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:104:y:1996:i:4:p:683-703
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ellison, Glenn & Fudenberg, Drew, 1993. "Rules of Thumb for Social Learning," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(4), pages 612-643, August.
    2. Mark A. Satterthwaite, 1979. "Consumer Information, Equilibrium Industry Price, and the Number of Sellers," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(2), pages 483-502, Autumn.
    3. Abhijit V. Banerjee, 1992. "A Simple Model of Herd Behavior," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(3), pages 797-817.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bing Jing, 2011. "Social Learning and Dynamic Pricing of Durable Goods," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 30(5), pages 851-865, September.
    2. Philipp Kircher & Andrew Postlewaite, 2008. "Strategic Firms and Endogenous Consumer Emulation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(2), pages 621-661.
    3. Daniel McFadden, 2014. "The new science of pleasure: consumer choice behavior and the measurement of well-being," Chapters,in: Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 2, pages 7-48 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Oriana Bandiera & Imran Rasul, 2006. "Social Networks and Technology Adoption in Northern Mozambique," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(514), pages 869-902, October.
    5. Chatzimichael, Konstantinos & Genius, Margarita & Tzouvelekas, Vangelis, 2014. "Informational cascades and technology adoption: Evidence from Greek and German organic growers," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 186-195.
    6. Emanuela Randon, 2002. "L’analisi positiva dell’esternalità: rassegna della letteratura e nuovi spunti," Working Papers 58, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2002.
    7. Zegners, Dainis, 2017. "Building an Online Reputation with Free Content: Evidence from the E-book Market," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168293, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    8. Hiroshi Kitamura, 2007. "Capacity Expansion in Markets with Intertemporal Consumption Externalities," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 07-11, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    9. Kaustia, Markku & Rantala, Ville, 2015. "Social learning and corporate peer effects," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 653-669.
    10. Martin Gaynor & Yunfeng Shi & Rahul Telang & William Vogt, 2005. "Cell Phone Demand and Consumer Learning – An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers 05-28, NET Institute, revised Oct 2005.
    11. Dirk Bergemann & Juuso Välimäki, 2000. "Experimentation in Markets," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(2), pages 213-234.
    12. Raphaël Suire & Thierry Pénard & Fabrice Le Guel, 2005. "Adoption et usage marchand de l’Internet : une étude économétrique sur données bretonnes," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 167(1), pages 67-84.
    13. Bergemann, Dirk & Valimaki, Juuso, 2002. "Entry and Vertical Differentiation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 106(1), pages 91-125, September.
    14. Richards, Timothy J. & Patterson, Paul M., 2000. "New Varieties And The Returns To Commodity Promotion: The Case Of Fuji Apples," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 29(1), April.
    15. Fumio Ohtake & Katsunori Yamada, 2013. "Appraising the Unhappiness due to the Great East Japan Earthquake: Evidence from Weekly Panel Data on Subjective Well-being," ISER Discussion Paper 0876, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    16. Kaustia, Markku & Knüpfer, Samuli, 2012. "Peer performance and stock market entry," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 321-338.
    17. Stivers, Andrew & Tremblay, Victor J., 2005. "Advertising, search costs, and social welfare," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 317-333, July.
    18. Lidia Dandedjrohoun & Aliou Diagne & Gauthier Biaou & Simon N'Cho & Soul-Kifouly Midingoyi, 2012. "Determinants of diffusion and adoption of improved technology for rice parboiling in Benin," Post-Print hal-00939350, HAL.
    19. Daniel L. McFadden, 2013. "The New Science of Pleasure," NBER Working Papers 18687, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Edward Cartwright, 2007. "Social Learning, Search and Heterogeneity of Payoffs," Studies in Economics 0705, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    21. Richards, Timothy J. & Patterson, Paul M., 1998. "New Varieties and the Returns to Commodity Promotion: Washington Fuji Apples," Working Papers 28541, Arizona State University, Morrison School of Agribusiness and Resource Management.
    22. Lidia Dandedjrohoun & Aliou Diagne & Gauthier Biaou & Simon N’cho & Soul-Kifouly Midingoyi, 2012. "Determinants of diffusion and adoption of improved technology for rice parboiling in Benin," Review of Agricultural and Environmental Studies - Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 93(2), pages 171-191.

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