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The Effect of Job Tenure on Wage Offers

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  • Marshall, Robert C
  • Zarkin, Gary A

Abstract

A wage offer can be either acceptable or unacceptable to a worker, but in cross-sectional and panel data only acceptable wage offers are observed. An OLS wage equ ation will not reveal how job tenure affects wage offers but rather w ill reveal how tenure affects acceptable wage offers. By jointly mode ling the firm's determination of the wage offer and the worker's deci sion to accept or reject the offer, the authors are able to estimate the effect of job tenure on wage offers consistently. In contrast to the usual OLS results, they find that job tenure has no statistically significant effect on wage offers. Copyright 1987 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Marshall, Robert C & Zarkin, Gary A, 1987. "The Effect of Job Tenure on Wage Offers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(3), pages 301-324, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:5:y:1987:i:3:p:301-24
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Parent, Daniel, 2002. "Matching, human capital, and the covariance structure of earnings," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 375-404, July.
    2. Andrew Weiss, 1995. "Human Capital vs. Signalling Explanations of Wages," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 133-154, Fall.
    3. Carl Davidson & Stephen A. Woodbury, 2001. "From Social Experiment to Program," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers,in: Philip K. Robins & Robert G. Spiegelman (ed.), Reemployment Bonuses in the Unemployment Insurance System: Evidence from Three Field Experiments, chapter 6, pages 175-222 W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    4. Schneider, Lutz, 2007. "Zu alt für einen Wechsel? Zum Zusammenhang von Alter, Lohndifferentialen und betrieblicher Mobilität," IWH Discussion Papers 1/2007, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    5. Joseph G. Altonji & Nicolas Williams, 2005. "Do Wages Rise with Job Seniority? A Reassessment," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 58(3), pages 370-397, April.
    6. Jacob Mincer, 1988. "Job Training, Wage Growth, and Labor Turnover," NBER Working Papers 2690, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Neil Foster-McGregor & Sebastian Leitner & Sandra M. Leitner & Johannes Pöschl & Robert Stehrer, 2014. "Earnings Distributions and Dimensions of Inequality," wiiw Research Reports 399, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    8. Kampkötter, Patrick & Sliwka, Dirk, 2014. "Wage premia for newly hired employees," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 45-60.
    9. Andrew Weiss & Ruqu Wang, 1990. "A Sorting Model of Labor Contracts: Implications for Layoffs and Wage-Tenure Profiles," NBER Working Papers 3448, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Williams, Nicolas, 2009. "Seniority, experience, and wages in the UK," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 272-283, June.
    11. Kuan‐Jen Chen & Ching‐Chong Lai, 2015. "On‐the‐Job Learning and News‐Driven Business Cycles," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(2-3), pages 261-294, March.
    12. Topel, Robert H, 1991. "Specific Capital, Mobility, and Wages: Wages Rise with Job Seniority," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(1), pages 145-176, February.
    13. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pb:p:2439-2483 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Laura Hospido, 2009. "Job changes and individual-job specific wage dynamics," Working Papers 0907, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    15. Brunello, Giorgio & Ariga, Kenn, 1997. "Earnings and seniority in Japan: A re-appraisal of the existing evidence and a comparison with the UK," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 47-69, March.
    16. Michael Waldman, 1988. "Interpreting Evidence on Returns to Tenure: The Significance of Quasi-Specific Human Capital," UCLA Economics Working Papers 479, UCLA Department of Economics.
    17. Ohkusa, Yasushi, 1995. "Testing for the matching hypothesis in Japanese manufacturing," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 175-198, July.
    18. Joseph G. Altonji & Nicolas Williams, 1992. "The Effects of Labor Market Experience, Job Seniority, and Job Mobility on Wage Growth," NBER Working Papers 4133, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Mengistae, Taye, 1999. "The relative effects of skill formation and job matching on wage growth in Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2104, The World Bank.
    20. Wang, Ruqu & Weiss, Andrew, 1998. "Probation, layoffs, and wage-tenure profiles: A sorting explanation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 359-383, September.

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