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The Political Consequences of Income Shocks: Explaining the Consolidation of Democracy in France

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  • Raphaël Franck

    (Bar Ilan University)

Abstract

This study analyzes the circumstances that enabled France to become in the late nineteenth century the first stable parliamentary democracy with universal (male) suffrage in Europe. It establishes a causal relationship between short-term variations in local income and the electoral support for the coalition of republican parties that represented the newly established regime. The results suggest the republican coalition won the parliamentary elections because most French regions did not suffer from transitory negative income shocks stemming from heavy precipitations. They thus raise questions about the rationality of voters and, ultimately, the actual causes of the consolidation of democracy in France.

Suggested Citation

  • Raphaël Franck, 2016. "The Political Consequences of Income Shocks: Explaining the Consolidation of Democracy in France," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(1), pages 57-82, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:98:y:2016:i:1:p:57-82
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    File URL: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/REST_a_00477
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. François Facchini & Mickael Melki, 2014. "Political Ideology And Economic Growth: Evidence From The French Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(4), pages 1408-1426, October.
    2. Chambru, Cédric & Viallet-Thévenin, Scott, 2017. "Mobilité sociale et empire colonial : Les gouverneurs coloniaux français entre 1830 et 1960," Working Papers unige:100709, University of Geneva, Paul Bairoch Institute of Economic History.
    3. Raphaël Franck & Oded Galor, 2017. "Technology-Skill Complementarity in Early Phases of Industrialization," NBER Working Papers 23197, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Fuchs-Schündeln, N. & Hassan, T.A., 2016. "Natural Experiments in Macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    5. François Facchini & Mickael Melki, 2014. "Political Ideology And Economic Growth: Evidence From The French Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(4), pages 1408-1426, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Democracy; Economic Growth; Voting;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • N13 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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