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Modes of Interaction and Performance of Human Service Networks

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  • Fredrik Lindencrona
  • Solvig Ekblad
  • Runo Axelsson

Abstract

Performance in health and human service networks requires mutual adjustment between participating organizations with different competencies. In this article the impact of group modes of interaction concerning administration and steering and direct service delivery upon different dimensions of network performance and client outcomes is tested in a sample of eighty-three local networks of refugee resettlement support in Sweden. The results show that networks with group modes of interaction concerning both issues generally perform best, but the effect varies across performance dimensions, is modified by availability of needed competence in the network and does not easily translate to client outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Fredrik Lindencrona & Solvig Ekblad & Runo Axelsson, 2009. "Modes of Interaction and Performance of Human Service Networks," Public Management Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 191-215, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:pubmgr:v:11:y:2009:i:2:p:191-215
    DOI: 10.1080/14719030802685404
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Myrna Mandell & Toddi Steelman, 2003. "Understanding what can be accomplished through interorganizational innovations The importance of typologies, context and management strategies," Public Management Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 197-224, June.
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    3. Rhys Andrews & George A. Boyne & Gareth Enticott, 2006. "Performance failure in the public sector," Public Management Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 273-296, June.
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    5. Stephen P. Osborne, 2006. "The New Public Governance?-super-1," Public Management Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(3), pages 377-387, September.
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