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Aid for trade as a public good

  • Chun-Chieh Wang
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    Aid for trade (A4T) can be classified as a public good. In the case of more than two donors, independent bilateral provision of A4T must be insufficient. This article suggests that international organisations can be a solution to insufficient A4T. However, those international organisations must adopt new methods of coordinating donors and recipients as well as a cost-sharing rule based on the share of benefit can help.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/09638190903360220
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    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development.

    Volume (Year): 20 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 6 (September)
    Pages: 711-728

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:jitecd:v:20:y:2011:i:6:p:711-728
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    1. Bougheas, Spiros & Demetriades, Panicos O. & Morgenroth, Edgar L. W., 1999. "Infrastructure, transport costs and trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 169-189, February.
    2. Dollar, David & Alesina, Alberto, 2000. "Who Gives Foreign Aid to Whom and Why?," Scholarly Articles 4553020, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    3. Fleck, Robert K. & Kilby, Christopher & Fleck, Robert K., 2001. "World Bank Independence: A Model and Statistical Analysis of U.S. Influence," Vassar College Department of Economics Working Paper Series 53, Vassar College Department of Economics.
    4. Thomas Barnebeck Andersen & Henrik Hansen & Thomas Markussen, 2006. "US politics and World Bank IDA-lending," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(5), pages 772-794.
    5. David H. Romer & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1999. "Does Trade Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 379-399, June.
    6. Eric W. Bond, 2006. "Transportation Infrastructure Investments And Trade Liberalization," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 57(4), pages 483-500.
    7. Johannes Urpelainen, 2009. "Political-economic problems in trade capacity building," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 329-359, December.
    8. Steven Brakman & Harry Garretsen & Charles van Marrewijk, 2006. "Agglomeration and Aid," CESifo Working Paper Series 1750, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Boadway, Robin & Hayashi, Masayoshi, 1999. "Country size and the voluntary provision of international public goods," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 619-638, November.
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