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The Determinants and Prospects of Economic Growth in Asia

Author

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  • Radelet Steven
  • Sachs Jeffrey
  • Lee Jong-Wha

Abstract

This paper analyses Asia's growth experience in a broad historical and international context. East Asian countries grew faster than the rest of the world for four key reasons: they had substantial potential for catching up, their geography and structural characteristics were by- and large favorable, demographic changes worked in favor of more rapid growth, and their economic policies and strategy were conducive to sustained growth. Although the financial crisis of 1997 abruptly brought a halt to Asia's period of robust growth, there was little in Asia's fundamental growth strategy that inevitably led to the crisis. The key to the crisis was too much short-term capital flowing into weak and under-supervised financial systems. This suggests that with better financial management and a return to the core policies that resulted in rapid growth, the East Asian economies can again return to sustained growth. [O11, O40, O53]

Suggested Citation

  • Radelet Steven & Sachs Jeffrey & Lee Jong-Wha, 2001. "The Determinants and Prospects of Economic Growth in Asia," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 1-29.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:intecj:v:15:y:2001:i:3:p:1-29
    DOI: 10.1080/10168730100000041
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. James B. Ang & Jakob B. Madsen, 2011. "Can Second-Generation Endogenous Growth Models Explain the Productivity Trends and Knowledge Production in the Asian Miracle Economies?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 1360-1373, November.
    2. Ang, James B., 2010. "Financial Reforms, Patent Protection, and Knowledge Accumulation in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 1070-1081, August.
    3. Md. Rabiul Islam & James B. Ang & Jakob B. Madsen, 2014. "Quality-Adjusted Human Capital And Productivity Growth," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(2), pages 757-777, April.
    4. Chirwa, Themba Gilbert & Odhiambo, Nicholas Mbaya, 2016. "An empirical test of the exogenous growth models: Evidence from three Southern African countries," Working Papers 21083, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    5. repec:eco:journ1:2017-04-86 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:vrs:seejeb:v:11:y:2016:i:2:p:33-47:n:3 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Michael Clemens & Steven Radelet & Rikhil Bhavnani, 2004. "Counting Chickens When They Hatch: The Short-term Effect of Aid on Growth," Working Papers 44, Center for Global Development.
    8. Ang, James B. & Madsen, Jakob B. & Rabiul Islam, Md., 2011. "The effects of human capital composition on technological convergence," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 465-476, September.
    9. Lee, Jong-Wha & Hong, Kiseok, 2012. "Economic growth in Asia: Determinants and prospects," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 101-113.
    10. Gómez-Puig, Marta & Sosvilla-Rivero, Simón, 2017. "Heterogeneity in the debt-growth nexus: Evidence from EMU countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 470-486.
    11. Saubhik Deb, 2006. "Trade First and Trade Fast: A Duration Analysis of Recovery from Currency Crisis," Departmental Working Papers 200607, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    12. James B. Ang & Jakob B. Madsen, 2013. "International R&D Spillovers And Productivity Trends In The Asian Miracle Economies," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 51(2), pages 1523-1541, April.
    13. Jean-Pascal Bassino & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2015. "From Commodity Booms to Economic Miracles: Why Southeast Asian Industry Lagged Behind," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 201507, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    14. Themba G. Chirwa & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2017. "Sources of Economic Growth in Zambia: An Empirical Investigation," Global Business Review, International Management Institute, vol. 18(2), pages 275-290, April.
    15. Chirwa, Themba G & Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2018. "Electricity Consumption And Economic Growth: New Evidence From Twelve Countries," Working Papers 23508, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    16. Guanghua Wan & Peter J. Morgan & Jong-Wha Lee, 2016. "Korea's Economic Growth and Catch-up: Implications for China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 24(5), pages 71-97, September.
    17. Yung Chul Park & Jong-Wha Lee, 2003. "Recovery and Sustainability in East Asia," NBER Chapters,in: Managing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 275-320 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Martin Ravallion & Michael Lokshin, 2007. "Lasting Impacts of Indonesia’s Financial Crisis," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 27-56.
    19. Chirwa, Themba G & Odhiambo, Nicholas M, 2016. "The drivers of real sector growth in Malawi: an empirical investigation," Working Papers 20037, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    20. Marta Gómez-Puig & Simón Sosvilla-Rivero, 2017. "Nonfinancial debt and economic growth in euro-area countries," IREA Working Papers 201714, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jul 2017.
    21. Kyriakos C. Neanidis & Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2007. "The Allocation of volatile aid and economic growth: Evidence and a suggestive theory," Discussion Paper Series 2007_07, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Mar 2007.
    22. Farhadi, Minoo & Islam, Md. Rabiul & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2015. "Economic Freedom and Productivity Growth in Resource-rich Economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 109-126.
    23. Leshoro, Temitope L A, 2017. "An empirical analysis of disaggregated government expenditure and economic growth in South Africa," Working Papers 22644, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.

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