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Spending To Save? The Cost-Effectiveness Of Conflict Prevention

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  • Malcolm Chalmers

Abstract

While the general argument that it is easier and more cost-effective to prevent conflicts before the outbreak of violence has considerable attraction, a rigorous approach to estimating the cost and benefits of this policy is still lacking. The objective of this study is to contribute to the development of such an approach. The project involves six case studies, three retrospective (the Western Balkans, Afghanistan, and Rwanda) and three prospective (Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and southern Sudan). Its main conclusion is that targeted programmes of conflict prevention are (or would have been) significantly cheaper than cure.

Suggested Citation

  • Malcolm Chalmers, 2007. "Spending To Save? The Cost-Effectiveness Of Conflict Prevention," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 1-23.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:18:y:2007:i:1:p:1-23
    DOI: 10.1080/10242690600821693
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Paul Collier & V. L. Elliott & Håvard Hegre & Anke Hoeffler & Marta Reynal-Querol & Nicholas Sambanis, 2003. "Breaking the Conflict Trap : Civil War and Development Policy," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13938, December.
    2. Benedict J. Clements & Sanjeev Gupta & Shamit Chakravarti & Rina Bhattacharya, 2002. "Fiscal Consequences of Armed Conflict and Terrorism in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 02/142, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Rodrigo R. Soares, 2003. "The Welfare Cost of Violence (New Version: Corrected Calculations)," Law and Economics 0312003, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 13 Sep 2004.
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    Cited by:

    1. Çağatay Bircan & Tilman Brück & Marc Vothknecht, 2017. "Violent conflict and inequality," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(2), pages 125-144, April.
    2. Hannes Mueller & Christopher Rauh, 2019. "The hard problem of prediction for conflict prevention," Cahiers de recherche 2019-02, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.

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