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The impact of workers' compensation on wage premiums for job hazards


  • Ronald Meng
  • Douglas Smith


The existence of a trade-off between occupational risk and earnings is well known. Most studies, however, ignore how public insurance systems, like workers' compensation (WC) affect this trade-off. This paper incorporates the workers' compensation system into a hedonic earnings function for paid employees. The results show that workers' compensation lowers the wage-risk trade-off for a sample of Ontario workers. In the absence of workers' compensation, employees would receive a significantly higher risk premium for exposure to the possibility of occupational injuries. This implies that labour markets will provide more than the socially optimal degree of risk if experience rating of workers' compensation is incomplete.

Suggested Citation

  • Ronald Meng & Douglas Smith, 1999. "The impact of workers' compensation on wage premiums for job hazards," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(9), pages 1101-1108.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:31:y:1999:i:9:p:1101-1108
    DOI: 10.1080/000368499323580

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Per Andersen & Niels Christian Petersen, 1993. "A Procedure for Ranking Efficient Units in Data Envelopment Analysis," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 39(10), pages 1261-1264, October.
    2. Borden, James P., 1988. "An assessment of the impact of diagnosis-related group (DRG)-based reimbursement on the technical efficiency of New Jersey hospitals using data envelopment analysis," Journal of Accounting and Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 77-96.
    3. Blomqvist, Ake, 1991. "The doctor as double agent: Information asymmetry, health insurance, and medical care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 411-432.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dionne, Georges & Lebeau, Martin, 2010. "Le calcul de la valeur statistique d’une vie humaine," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 86(4), pages 487-530, décembre.
    2. Viscusi, W Kip & Aldy, Joseph E, 2003. "The Value of a Statistical Life: A Critical Review of Market Estimates throughout the World," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 5-76, August.
    3. repec:kap:jrisku:v:54:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11166-017-9255-1 is not listed on IDEAS

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