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How important are noncorporate patents? A comparative analysis using patent citations data


  • Cedric Schneider


This article analyses the innovative performances of noncorporate inventors using patent citations data from the European Patent Office. The results show that inventions patented outside an established corporate framework are on average less 'important' than corporate patents, but with large variations across technology classes. Patents applied for by independent inventors, start-ups and corporate firms are of comparable 'quality' in emerging technologies. The results also highlight that in these fields noncorporate patents are more 'radical' than corporate patents.

Suggested Citation

  • Cedric Schneider, 2011. "How important are noncorporate patents? A comparative analysis using patent citations data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(9), pages 865-871.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:18:y:2011:i:9:p:865-871 DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2010.507168

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2004. "Modelling low income transitions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 593-610.
    2. Rendtel, Ulrich & Langeheine, Rolf & Berntsen, Roland, 1998. "The Estimation of Poverty Dynamics Using Different Measurements of Household Income," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 44(1), pages 81-98, March.
    3. Francesco Devicienti, 2011. "Estimating poverty persistence in Britain," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 657-686, May.
    4. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
    5. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 2010. "Who cares about relative deprivation?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 171-185, February.
    6. Stefan Dercon & Pramila Krishnan, 2000. "Vulnerability, seasonality and poverty in Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 25-53.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nicolas van Zeebroeck & Bruno van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, 2011. "Filing strategies and patent value," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(6), pages 539-561, February.
    2. repec:spr:scient:v:99:y:2014:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-013-1195-1 is not listed on IDEAS

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