IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/masfgc/v24y2019i4d10.1007_s11027-019-9844-1.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Tropical peatlands under siege: the need for evidence-based policies and strategies

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel Murdiyarso

    (Center for International Forestry Research
    Bogor Agricultural University)

  • Erik Lilleskov

    (USDA Forest Service)

  • Randy Kolka

    (USDA Forest Service)

Abstract

It is widely known that tropical peatlands, including peat swamp forests (PSFs), provide numerous ecosystem services in both spatial and temporal dimensions. These include their role as large stores for organic carbon, which when not managed well could be released as carbon dioxide and methane, accelerating climate warming. Massive destruction and conversion of peatlands occur at an alarming rate in some regions. We hope that the lessons learned from those regions currently under siege from conversion can inform other regions that are at the precipice of mass conversion to agriculture. Much has been learned about high latitude, northern hemisphere peatlands but less is known about tropical peatlands. We collate, analyze, and synthesize the evidence revealed from the set of articles in this special issue. This special issue is a step forward, presenting new information generated from a considerable amount of field data collected from peatlands across the tropics in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The hard data collected using comparable scientific methodologies are analyzed and compared with existing published data to form a larger dataset as scientific evidence. The synthesis is then interpreted to generate new knowledge to inform the policy community on how to strategize the sustainable management of tropical peatlands. Carbon (C) stocks in tropical peatland ecosystems can be as large as 3000 Mg C ha−1, but the rate of loss is also phenomenal, causing substantial emissions of greenhouse gases of more than 20 Mg C ha−1 year−1. These losses have mainly taken place in Southeast Asia, particularly Indonesia, where peatland development for oil palm and pulpwood has accelerated over the past few decades. Although peatlands in the Amazon and Congo Basin are less developed, it is possible that the same unsustainable pathway would be followed in these regions, if lessons from the dire situation in Southeast Asia are not learned. Strong policies to halt further loss of tropical peatlands may be drawn up and combined with incentives that promote a global agenda under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 21st Conference of the Parties, Paris, France, Agreement. However, we also propose a framework to address national and local agendas that can be implemented under the nationally determined contributions (NDCs) by balancing conversion/development and conservation/restoration objectives.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Murdiyarso & Erik Lilleskov & Randy Kolka, 2019. "Tropical peatlands under siege: the need for evidence-based policies and strategies," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 24(4), pages 493-505, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:24:y:2019:i:4:d:10.1007_s11027-019-9844-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s11027-019-9844-1
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11027-019-9844-1
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1007/s11027-019-9844-1?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andreas Haensler & Fahad Saeed & Daniela Jacob, 2013. "Assessing the robustness of projected precipitation changes over central Africa on the basis of a multitude of global and regional climate projections," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 121(2), pages 349-363, November.
    2. K. Hergoualc’h & L. Verchot, 2014. "Greenhouse gas emission factors for land use and land-use change in Southeast Asian peatlands," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 19(6), pages 789-807, August.
    3. Daniel Murdiyarso & Erna Adiningsih, 2007. "Climate anomalies, Indonesian vegetation fires and terrestrial carbon emissions," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 101-112, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Greta C. Dargie & Ian T. Lawson & Tim J. Rayden & Lera Miles & Edward T. A. Mitchard & Susan E. Page & Yannick E. Bocko & Suspense A. Ifo & Simon L. Lewis, 2019. "Congo Basin peatlands: threats and conservation priorities," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 24(4), pages 669-686, April.
    2. Mouhamadou Bamba Sylla & Nellie Elguindi & Filippo Giorgi & Dominik Wisser, 2016. "Projected robust shift of climate zones over West Africa in response to anthropogenic climate change for the late 21st century," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 134(1), pages 241-253, January.
    3. Mouhamadou Sylla & Nellie Elguindi & Filippo Giorgi & Dominik Wisser, 2016. "Projected robust shift of climate zones over West Africa in response to anthropogenic climate change for the late 21st century," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 134(1), pages 241-253, January.
    4. Fahad Saeed & Mansour Almazroui & Nazrul Islam & Mariam Saleh Khan, 2017. "Intensification of future heat waves in Pakistan: a study using CORDEX regional climate models ensemble," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 87(3), pages 1635-1647, July.
    5. Meine van Noordwijk & Robin Matthews & Fahmuddin Agus & Jenny Farmer & Louis Verchot & Kristell Hergoualc’h & Sebastian Persch & Hesti Tata & Betha Lusiana & Atiek Widayati & Sonya Dewi, 2014. "Mud, muddle and models in the knowledge value-chain to action on tropical peatland conservation," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 19(6), pages 887-905, August.
    6. Thierry C. Fotso-Nguemo & Ismaïla Diallo & Moussa Diakhaté & Derbetini A. Vondou & Mamadou L. Mbaye & Andreas Haensler & Amadou T. Gaye & Clément Tchawoua, 2019. "Projected changes in the seasonal cycle of extreme rainfall events from CORDEX simulations over Central Africa," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 155(3), pages 339-357, August.
    7. Erik Lilleskov & Kevin McCullough & Kristell Hergoualc’h & Dennis Castillo Torres & Rodney Chimner & Daniel Murdiyarso & Randy Kolka & Laura Bourgeau-Chavez & John Hribljan & Jhon Aguila Pasquel & Cra, 2019. "Is Indonesian peatland loss a cautionary tale for Peru? A two-country comparison of the magnitude and causes of tropical peatland degradation," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 24(4), pages 591-623, April.
    8. Jonah Busch & Jens Engelmann, 2015. "The Future of Forests: Emissions from Tropical Deforestation With and Without a Carbon Price, 2016-2050," Working Papers id:7819, eSocialSciences.
    9. Babatunde J. Abiodun & Jimmy Adegoke & Abayomi A. Abatan & Chidi A. Ibe & Temitope S. Egbebiyi & Francois Engelbrecht & Izidine Pinto, 2017. "Potential impacts of climate change on extreme precipitation over four African coastal cities," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 143(3), pages 399-413, August.
    10. Herawati, Hety & Santoso, Heru, 2011. "Tropical forest susceptibility to and risk of fire under changing climate: A review of fire nature, policy and institutions in Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 227-233, April.
    11. Surahman, Arif & Soni, Peeyush & Shivakoti, Ganesh P., 2018. "Reducing CO2 emissions and supporting food security in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, with improved peatland management," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 325-332.
    12. Ahmed, Shamseddin Musa, 2020. "Impacts of drought, food security policy and climate change on performance of irrigation schemes in Sub-saharan Africa: The case of Sudan," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 232(C).

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:24:y:2019:i:4:d:10.1007_s11027-019-9844-1. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Sonal Shukla or Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.