IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/masfgc/v21y2016i2p191-207.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Toward a framework of environmental risk management for CO 2 geological storage in china: gaps and suggestions for future regulations

Author

Listed:
  • Lan-Cui Liu

    ()

  • Qi Li
  • Jiu-Tian Zhang
  • Dong Cao

Abstract

China encourages the demonstration of carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects. In an effort to identify gaps and provide suggestions for environmental risk management of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) geological storage in China, this article presents a concise overview of potential health, safety and environmental (HSE) risks and environmental management regulations for CO 2 geological storage in Australia, Japan, the United States (USA), the European Union (EU), and the United Kingdom (UK). The environmental impact assessment (EIA) experience of Shenhua Ordos Coal-to-Liquid (CTL) Project and PetroChina Jilin Oil Field enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is subsequently analyzed in light of our field investigation, and gaps in current EIA guidelines that are applicable to CO 2 geological storage projects are identified. It is found that there are no specific environmental risk regulations suitable for CO 2 storage in China, and environmental risk management lags behind the development of CCS technology, which presents a challenge to demonstration enterprises in terms of assessing environmental risk. One major challenge is the overestimation or underestimation of this risk on the part of the enterprise, and another is a lack of applicable regulations for government sectors to supervise the risk throughout CCS projects. Therefore, there is a pressing need for China to formulate environmental management regulations that include environmental risk assessment, mandatory monitoring schemes, environmental emergency plans, and related issues. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Suggested Citation

  • Lan-Cui Liu & Qi Li & Jiu-Tian Zhang & Dong Cao, 2016. "Toward a framework of environmental risk management for CO 2 geological storage in china: gaps and suggestions for future regulations," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 191-207, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:21:y:2016:i:2:p:191-207
    DOI: 10.1007/s11027-014-9589-9
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11027-014-9589-9
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Benjamin Court & Thomas Elliot & Joseph Dammel & Thomas Buscheck & Jeremy Rohmer & Michael Celia, 2012. "Promising synergies to address water, sequestration, legal, and public acceptance issues associated with large-scale implementation of CO 2 sequestration," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 17(6), pages 569-599, August.
    2. Stewart Russell & Nils Markusson & Vivian Scott, 2012. "What will CCS demonstrations demonstrate?," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 17(6), pages 651-668, August.
    3. Peter Stigson & Anders Hansson & MÃ¥rten Lind, 2012. "Obstacles for CCS deployment: an analysis of discrepancies of perceptions," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 17(6), pages 601-619, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:21:y:2016:i:2:p:191-207. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.