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Immigrant Skills and Ethnic Spillovers


  • Borjas, George J


This paper investigates the hypothesis that ethnicity has spillover effects on the human capital accumulation process. It extends previous research by documenting the extent to which the relative importance of parental inputs and ethnic spillovers in the intergenerational transmission of skills differs both within and across immigrant and US-born ethnic groups. Using data drawn from the General Social Surveys, the study documents that the second and third generation (i.e., the children and grandchildren of immigrants) experience relatively more rapid economic advancement than do other generations, and that ethnic spillovers play a stronger role in households which are at the extremes of the skill distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Borjas, George J, 1994. "Immigrant Skills and Ethnic Spillovers," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 7(2), pages 99-118.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:7:y:1994:i:2:p:99-118

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Horst Siebert, 1993. "Internationale Wanderungsbewegungen - Erklärungsansätze und Gestaltungsfragen," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 129(III), pages 229-255, September.
    2. Riphahn Regina T., 2005. "Are there Diverging Time Trends in the Educational Attainment of Nationals and Second Generation Immigrants? / Unterscheiden sich die Trends in der Entwicklung des Bildungserfolges von Einheimischen u," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 225(3), pages 325-346, June.
    3. Brenner, Jan, 2010. "Life-cycle variations in the association between current and lifetime earnings: Evidence for German natives and guest workers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 392-406, April.
    4. Pereira, Pedro Telhado & Tavares, Lara Patricio, 2000. "Portuguese Population in France: a snapshot 25 years after their arrival," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp375, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    5. Saarela, Jan & Finnas, Fjalar, 2006. "Can the low unemployment rate of Swedish speakers in Finland be attributed to structural factors?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 498-513, June.
    6. repec:zbw:rwirep:0095 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Kucera, Miroslav, 2008. "The Educational Attainment of Second Generation Immigrants in Canada: Analysis based on the General Social Survey," MPRA Paper 14036, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Jan Brenner, 2009. "Life-Cycle Variations in the Association between Current and Lifetime Earnings – Evidence for German Natives and Guest Workers," Ruhr Economic Papers 0095, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    9. Fairchild, Gregory B., 2010. "Intergenerational ethnic enclave influences on the likelihood of being self-employed," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 290-304, May.
    10. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2016. "Language and consumption," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 135-151.

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