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Using a boundary organization approach to develop a sea level rise and storm surge impact analysis framework for coastal communities in Maine

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  • Philip Camill

    ()

  • Maryellen Hearn
  • Krista Bahm
  • Eileen Johnson

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Camill & Maryellen Hearn & Krista Bahm & Eileen Johnson, 2012. "Using a boundary organization approach to develop a sea level rise and storm surge impact analysis framework for coastal communities in Maine," Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Springer;Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences, vol. 2(2), pages 111-130, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jenvss:v:2:y:2012:i:2:p:111-130
    DOI: 10.1007/s13412-011-0056-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nordhaus, William D, 1991. "To Slow or Not to Slow: The Economics of the Greenhouse Effect," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(407), pages 920-937, July.
    2. David Anthoff & Robert Nicholls & Richard Tol, 2010. "The economic impact of substantial sea-level rise," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 321-335, April.
    3. Andrew Ashton & Jeffrey Donnelly & Rob Evans, 2008. "A discussion of the potential impacts of climate change on the shorelines of the Northeastern USA," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 13(7), pages 719-743, August.
    4. Susanne Moser & Julia Ekstrom, 2011. "Taking ownership of climate change: participatory adaptation planning in two local case studies from California," Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Springer;Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences, vol. 1(1), pages 63-74, March.
    5. Francesco Bosello & Roberto Roson & Richard Tol, 2007. "Economy-wide Estimates of the Implications of Climate Change: Sea Level Rise," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 37(3), pages 549-571, July.
    6. Alistair Hunt & Paul Watkiss, 2011. "Climate change impacts and adaptation in cities: a review of the literature," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 104(1), pages 13-49, January.
    7. Stéphane Hallegatte & Fanny Henriet & Jan Corfee-Morlot, 2011. "The economics of climate change impacts and policy benefits at city scale: a conceptual framework," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 104(1), pages 51-87, January.
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