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Minimum income protection in the austerity tide

Listed author(s):
  • Sarah Marchal

    ()

  • Ive Marx
  • Natascha Van Mechelen

Scholarly literature is inconclusive on how economic crises impact on minimum income protection. Earlier studies found small increases in the generosity of safety nets at the onset of the crisis. Yet an increased focus on budget austerity substantially altered the social policy context. This paper assesses how minimum income floors weathered the austerity tide following the crisis using purpose-collected data for 23 EU countries. Generally, social assistance benefit trends did not deviate much from pre-crisis growth levels. Yet retrenchment did occur through more technical measures, the combined impact of which was quite significant in some countries. Jel codes: I380 Copyright Marchal et al. 2016

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1186/s40174-016-0052-7
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Article provided by Springer & Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA) in its journal IZA Journal of European Labor Studies.

Volume (Year): 5 (2016)
Issue (Month): 1 (December)
Pages: 1-20

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Handle: RePEc:spr:izaels:v:5:y:2016:i:1:p:1-20:10.1186/s40174-016-0052-7
DOI: 10.1186/s40174-016-0052-7
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  1. Dolls, Mathias & Fuest, Clemens & Peichl, Andreas, 2012. "Automatic stabilizers and economic crisis: US vs. Europe," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(3), pages 279-294.
  2. Eichhorst, Werner & Konle-Seidl, Regina, 2008. "Contingent Convergence: A Comparative Analysis of Activation Policies," IZA Discussion Papers 3905, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Natascha Van Mechelen & Sarah Marchal & Tim Goedemé & Ive Marx & Bea Cantillon, 2011. "The CSB-Minimum Income Protection Indicators dataset (CSB-MIPI)," Working Papers 1105, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
  4. Sarah Marchal & Natascha Van Mechelen, 2014. "A new kid in town? Active inclusion in European minimum income schemes," ImPRovE Working Papers 14/07, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
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