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Religion and fertility in the United States: New patterns

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  • William Mosher
  • Linda Williams
  • David Johnson

Abstract

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  • William Mosher & Linda Williams & David Johnson, 1992. "Religion and fertility in the United States: New patterns," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 29(2), pages 199-214, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:29:y:1992:i:2:p:199-214
    DOI: 10.2307/2061727
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin O’Connell & Carolyn Rogers, 1983. "Assesssing Cohort Birth Expectations Data from the Current Population Survey, 1971–1981," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 20(3), pages 369-384, August.
    2. Charles Westoff & Robert Potter & Philip Sagi, 1964. "Some selected findings of the princeton fertility study: 1963," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 1(1), pages 130-135, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Conrad Hackett & Marcin Stonawski & Michaela Potančoková & Brian J. Grim & Vegard Skirbekk, 2015. "The future size of religiously affiliated and unaffiliated populations," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(27), pages 829-842, April.
    2. Silvia Meggiolaro, 2010. "The importance of intentions in the mechanism of reproductive behaviour formation," Statistical Methods & Applications, Springer;Società Italiana di Statistica, vol. 19(1), pages 107-125, March.
    3. David de la Croix & Clara Delavallade, 2015. "Religions, Fertility and Growth in South-East Asia," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2015002, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    4. Cohen-Zada, Danny & Justman, Moshe, 2012. "Affinity and tension between religious denominations: Evidence from private school enrolment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 950-960.
    5. Evelyn Lehrer, 1996. "Religion as a determinant of marital fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 9(2), pages 173-196, June.
    6. Thomas Baudin, 2012. "More on Religion and Fertility: The French Connection," Working Papers hal-00993310, HAL.
    7. Linda Loury, 2006. "Teen Childbearing and Conservative Religious Communities," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0619, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    8. Lehrer, Evelyn L., 2008. "The Role of Religion in Economic and Demographic Behavior in the United States: A Review of the Recent Literature," IZA Discussion Papers 3541, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Thomas Baudin, 2015. "Religion and fertility: The French connection," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(13), pages 397-420, February.
    10. Jennifer Kane, 2013. "A Closer Look at the Second Demographic Transition in the US: Evidence of Bidirectionality from a Cohort Perspective (1982–2006)," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(1), pages 47-80, February.
    11. Shy, Oz, 2007. "Dynamic models of religious conformity and conversion: Theory and calibrations," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 1127-1153, July.
    12. Nitzan Peri-Rotem, 2016. "Religion and Fertility in Western Europe: Trends Across Cohorts in Britain, France and the Netherlands," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(2), pages 231-265, May.
    13. Tomas Frejka & Charles F. Westoff, 2006. "Religion, religiousness and fertility in the U.S. and in Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    14. Victor Agadjanian & Scott Yabiku, 2014. "Religious Affiliation and Fertility in a Sub-Saharan Context: Dynamic and Lifetime Perspectives," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 33(5), pages 673-691, October.
    15. repec:spr:eurpop:v:33:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10680-016-9409-x is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Teen Childbearing and Community Religiosity," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0405, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    17. Niko Matouschek & Imran Rasul, 2008. "The Economics of the Marriage Contract: Theories and Evidence," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(1), pages 59-110, February.
    18. Jeffrey Burr, 1995. "Metropolitan social structure, labor markets, and fertility," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 339-365, March.

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