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Noncustodial Fathers’ Ability to Pay Child Support

Author

Listed:
  • Irwin Garfinkel
  • Donald Oellerich

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Irwin Garfinkel & Donald Oellerich, 1989. "Noncustodial Fathers’ Ability to Pay Child Support," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 26(2), pages 219-233, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:26:y:1989:i:2:p:219-233
    DOI: 10.2307/2061521
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Larry Bumpass, 1984. "Children and marital disruption: A replication and update," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 21(1), pages 71-82, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rich, Lauren M., 2001. "Regular and irregular earnings of unwed fathers: Implications for child support practices," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 353-376.
    2. D. Del Boca & C. J. Flinn, "undated". "Welfare effects of fixed and percentage-expressed child support awards," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1041-94, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    3. Edin, Kathryn, 1995. "Single mothers and child support: The possibilities and limits of child support policy," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1-2), pages 203-230.
    4. Daniela Del Boca, 2003. "Mothers, fathers and children after divorce: The role of institutions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(3), pages 399-422, August.
    5. I. Lin, "undated". "Perceived Fairness and Compliance with Child Support Obligations," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1150-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    6. Marieka M. Klawitter & Irwin Garfinkel, 1992. "Child Support, Routine Income Withholding, And Post-Divorce Income," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 10(1), pages 52-64, January.
    7. Maureen A. Pirog & Kathleen M. Ziol-Guest, 2006. "Child support enforcement: Programs and policies, impacts and questions," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(4), pages 943-990.
    8. J. A. Seltzer, "undated". "Demographic change, children's families and child support policy in the United States," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1036-94, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    9. Robert I. Lerman & Elaine Sorenson, 2003. "Child Support: Interactions between Private and Public Transfers," NBER Chapters,in: Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, pages 587-628 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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