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“Our market is our community”: women farmers and civic agriculture in Pennsylvania, USA

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Listed:
  • Amy Trauger

    ()

  • Carolyn Sachs
  • Mary Barbercheck
  • Kathy Brasier
  • Nancy Kiernan

Abstract

Civic agriculture is characterized in the literature as complementary and embedded social and economic strategies that provide economic benefits to farmers at the same time that they ostensibly provide socio-environmental benefits to the community. This paper presents some ways in which women farmers practice civic agriculture. The data come from in-depth interviews with women practicing agriculture in Pennsylvania. Some of the strategies women farmers use to make a living from the farm have little to do with food or agricultural products, but all are a product of the process of providing a living for farmers while meeting a social need in the community. Most of the women in our study also connect their business practices to their gender identity in rural and agricultural communities, and redefine successful farming in opposition to traditional views of economic rationality. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Suggested Citation

  • Amy Trauger & Carolyn Sachs & Mary Barbercheck & Kathy Brasier & Nancy Kiernan, 2010. "“Our market is our community”: women farmers and civic agriculture in Pennsylvania, USA," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 27(1), pages 43-55, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:27:y:2010:i:1:p:43-55
    DOI: 10.1007/s10460-008-9190-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mellor, Mary, 1997. "Women, nature and the social construction of 'economic man'," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 129-140, February.
    2. Sonja Brodt & Gail Feenstra & Robin Kozloff & Karen Klonsky & Laura Tourte, 2006. "Farmer-Community Connections and the Future of Ecological Agriculture in California," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 23(1), pages 75-88, March.
    3. Julie A. Nelson, 1995. "Feminism and Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 131-148, Spring.
    4. Gail Feenstra, 2002. "Creating space for sustainable food systems: Lessons from the field," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 19(2), pages 99-106, June.
    5. Laura DeLind, 2002. "Place, work, and civic agriculture: Common fields for cultivation," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 19(3), pages 217-224, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Deller, Steven & Conroy, Tessa, 2015. "An Exploratory Analysis of Women Farmers and Rural Economic Growth and Development," Staff Paper Series 580, University of Wisconsin, Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    2. Jennifer Ball, 2014. "She works hard for the money: women in Kansas agriculture," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 31(4), pages 593-605, December.
    3. Nancy Kurland & Linda Aleci, 2015. "From civic institution to community place: the meaning of the public market in modern America," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 32(3), pages 505-521, September.
    4. repec:spr:agrhuv:v:34:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10460-016-9722-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Mira Lehberger & Norbert Hirschauer, 2016. "Recruitment problems and the shortage of junior corporate farm managers in Germany: the role of gender-specific assessments and life aspirations," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 33(3), pages 611-624, September.
    6. Zepeda, Lydia & Reznickova, Anna Alice & Russell, Willow Saranna & Hettenbach, David, 2014. "A Case Study of the Symbolic Value of Community Supported Agriculture Membership," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 45(2), July.
    7. Patrick Mundler & Sophie Laughrea, 2015. "Circuits alimentaires de proximité - Quels bénéfices pour le développement des territoires? Étude de cas dans trois territoires québécois," CIRANO Project Reports 2015rp-21, CIRANO.

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