IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/sae/joupea/v47y2010i5p575-587.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Much ado about religion: Religiosity, resource loss, and support for political violence

Author

Listed:
  • Daphna Canetti

    (Council on Middle East Studies, the MacMillan Center, and Department of Political Science, Yale, School of Political Science, the University of Haifa)

  • Stevan E Hobfoll

    (Department of Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College, Chicago)

  • Ami Pedahzur

    (Department of Government, University of Texas at Austin)

  • Eran Zaidise

    (Department of Political Science, Western Galilee College; and Center for the Study of Society, University of Haifa, ezaidise@gmail.com)

Abstract

The association between religion and violence has raised much interest in both academic and public circles. Yet on the individual level, existing empirical accounts are both sparse and conflicting. Based on previous research which found that religion plays a role in the support of political violence only through the mediation of objective and perceived deprivations, the authors test Conservation of Resource (COR) theory as an individual level explanation for the association of religion, socio-economic deprivations, and support for political violence. COR theory predicts that when individuals’ personal, social or economic resources are threatened, a response mechanism may include violence. Utilizing two distinct datasets, and relying on structural equation models analysis, the latter two stages of a three-stage study are reported here. In a follow-up to their previous article, the authors refine the use of socio-economic variables in examining the effects of deprivation as mediating between religion and political violence. Then, they analyze an independent sample of 545 Muslims and Jews, collected during August and September 2004, to test a psychological-based explanation based on COR theory. This study replaces measures of deprivation used in the previous stages with measures of economic and psychological resource loss. Findings show that the relationship between religion and support of political violence only holds true when mediated by deprivations and psychological resource loss. They also suggest that the typical tendency to focus on economic resource loss is over-simplistic as psychological, not economic, resources seem to mediate between religion and support of violence.

Suggested Citation

  • Daphna Canetti & Stevan E Hobfoll & Ami Pedahzur & Eran Zaidise, 2010. "Much ado about religion: Religiosity, resource loss, and support for political violence," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 47(5), pages 575-587, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:joupea:v:47:y:2010:i:5:p:575-587
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://jpr.sagepub.com/content/47/5/575.abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Desai, Raj M. & Olofsgård, Anders & Yousef, Tarik, 2018. "Signaling Dissent: Political Behavior in the Arab World," SITE Working Paper Series 45, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sae:joupea:v:47:y:2010:i:5:p:575-587. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (SAGE Publications). General contact details of provider: http://www.prio.no/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.