IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

La ubicuidad de los hábitos y las reglas

  • Geoffrey M. Hodgson


    (Universidad de Hertfordshire)

Under what circumstances is it necessary or convenient for an agent to rely on habits and rules? This paper focuses on the types of decision situation giving rise to their use. Even optimisation requires the development of rules, and for this reason mainstream economics cannot legitimately ignore these questions. It argues that habits and rules are ubiquitous in human activity, presents a new taxonomy and analyses seven types of decision situations classified according to the type of information problem involved. Neither neoclassical nor behavioural economics can provide a complete account of the bases of habits or rules in these cases.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía in its journal Revista de Economía Institucional.

Volume (Year): 2 (2000)
Issue (Month): 3 (July-december)
Pages: 11-43

in new window

Handle: RePEc:rei:ecoins:v:2:y:2000:i:3:p:11-43
Contact details of provider: Postal: Cra. 1 No. 12-68 Casa de las Mandolinas
Phone: (571) 2826066 Ext. 1307
Fax: (571) 2826066 Ext. 1304
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Geoffrey M. Hodgson (ed.), 1993. "The Economics of Institutions," Books, Edward Elgar, number 557, April.
  2. Field, Alexander James, 1981. "The problem with neoclassical institutional economics: A critique with special reference to the North/Thomas model of pre-1500 Europe," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 174-198, April.
  3. Rutherford,Malcolm, 1996. "Institutions in Economics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521574471, October.
  4. Teece, David J & Winter, Sidney G, 1984. "The Limits of Neoclassical Theory in Management Education," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 116-21, May.
  5. Conlisk, John, 1980. "Costly optimizers versus cheap imitators," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 275-293, September.
  6. Arrow, Kenneth J, 1982. "Risk Perception in Psychology and Economics," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 20(1), pages 1-9, January.
  7. Pingle, Mark, 1992. "Costly optimization: an experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 3-30, January.
  8. Buiter, Willem H, 1980. "The Macroeconomics of Dr. Pangloss: A Critical Survey of the New Classical Macroeconomics," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 90(357), pages 34-50, March.
  9. Leathers, Charles G., 1990. "Veblen and Hayek on Instincts and Evolution," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(02), pages 162-178, September.
  10. Tobin, James, 1980. "Are New Classical Models Plausible Enough to Guide Policy?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 12(4), pages 788-99, November.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rei:ecoins:v:2:y:2000:i:3:p:11-43. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Paola Rodríguez)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.