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Are Younger Cohorts Demanding Less Fresh Vegetables?

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  • Hayden Stewart
  • Noel Blisard

Abstract

The demand for vegetables is expected to increase with trends in the population of the United States. For example, having a college education increases demand, and more Americans are completing college. However, the possibility of a cohort effect has not been considered. A cohort includes people born in the same year, and is similar in concept to a generation. Using data collected over more than twenty years, we find younger cohorts spend less money on fresh vegetables for at-home consumption than their older counterparts do. These effects will decrease demand over time. Changing cooking habits may explain this effect. Copyright 2008, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Hayden Stewart & Noel Blisard, 2008. "Are Younger Cohorts Demanding Less Fresh Vegetables?," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 30(1), pages 43-60.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:revage:v:30:y:2008:i:1:p:43-60
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-9353.2007.00391.x
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    1. repec:ags:gjagec:232331 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Schroeter, Christiane & House, Lisa A., 2015. "Fruit and Vegetable Consumption of College Students: What is the Role of Food Culture?," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 46(3), pages 1-22, November.
    3. Geir Gustavsen & Kyrre Rickertsen, 2014. "Consumer cohorts and purchases of nonalcoholic beverages," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 427-449, March.
    4. Christiane Schroeter & Sven Anders & Andrea Carlson, 2013. "The Economics of Health and Vitamin Consumption," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 35(1), pages 125-149.
    5. Carlson, Andrea & Dong, Diansheng & Lino, Mark, 2014. "Association between Total Diet Cost and Diet Quality Is Limited," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 39(1), pages 1-22, April.
    6. Drescher, Larissa S. & Roosen, Jutta, 2013. "A Cohort Analysis of Food-at-Home and Food-away-from-Home Expenditures in Germany," Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, vol. 62(1).
    7. Carlson, Andrea & Dong, Diansheng & Lino, Mark, 2010. "Are The Total Daily Cost Of Food And Diet Quality Related: A Random Effects Panel Data Analysis," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116395, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Stewart, Hayden & Dong, Diansheng & Carlson, Andrea, 2012. "Is Generational Change Contributing to the Decline in Fluid Milk Consumption?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 37(3), pages 1-20.
    9. Gustavsen, Geir Waehler & Rickertsen, Kyrre, 2009. "Consumer Cohorts and Demand Systems," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51566, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Drescher, Larissa S. & Roosen, Jutta, 2010. "An Analysis Of The Retirement-Consumption Puzzle For Food-At-Home And Away-From-Home Expenditures In Germany," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116441, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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