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What Long-Term Road Transport Future? Trends and Policy Options


  • Stef Proost
  • Kurt Van Dender


This article examines long-term trends and broad policy options and challenges related to the road transport sector and its congestion and environmental impacts. A brief review of long-term projections of demand for road transport suggests that problems related to road network congestion and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are likely to become more pressing in the future than they are now. Next we review, from a macroscopic perspective, three policy measures aimed at addressing these problems: stimulating shifts in transport modes to decrease congestion and GHG emissions, boosting low-carbon technology adoption to reduce GHG emissions, and regulating land use to reduce road transport volumes. We find that although these policies can produce tangible results, they may also have unintended and costly consequences. Copyright 2011, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Stef Proost & Kurt Van Dender, 2011. "What Long-Term Road Transport Future? Trends and Policy Options," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 5(1), pages 44-65, Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:renvpo:v:5:y:2011:i:1:p:44-65

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fetene, Gebeyehu M. & Hirte, Georg & Kaplan, Sigal & Prato, Carlo G. & Tscharaktschiew, Stefan, 2016. "The economics of workplace charging," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 93-118.
    2. Proost, Stef & Van Dender, Kurt, 2012. "Energy and environment challenges in the transport sector," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 77-87.
    3. Soren T. Anderson & James M. Sallee, 2016. "Designing Policies to Make Cars Greener: A Review of the Literature," NBER Working Papers 22242, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Tscharaktschiew, Stefan, 2014. "Shedding light on the appropriateness of the (high) gasoline tax level in Germany," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 189-210.
    5. Kulmer, Veronika & Koland, Olivia & Steininger, Karl W. & Fürst, Bernhard & Käfer, Andreas, 2014. "The interaction of spatial planning and transport policy: A regional perspective on sprawl," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 7(1), pages 57-77.
    6. Floater, Graham & Rode, Philipp & Robert, Alexis & Kennedy, Chris & Hoornweg, Dan & Slavcheva, Roxana & Godfrey, Nick, 2014. "Cities and the New Climate Economy: the transformative role of global urban growth," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60775, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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