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Corruption and air pollution in Europe

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  • Kate Ivanova

Abstract

This paper examines how the effectiveness of regulatory framework influences levels of sulphur emissions in a scenario where, to reduce its (emission-) tax payments, a polluting firm may under-report emissions level at the risk of being audited and fined. First, a model to explain how changes in regulatory framework (e.g., audit effectiveness) and transboundary spillovers affect both actual and reported emissions is developed. Then the theoretical predictions using data for 39 European countries from 1999 to 2003 are tested and inferences about true emission levels are made. The empirical analysis supports the theoretical predictions with significant implications for the interpretation of pollution data reported to international monitoring agencies. Countries with effective regulation are likely to have relatively high reported emissions of sulphur. But this should not automatically be interpreted as weak environmental performance, because their actual pollution levels are likely to be lower than in nations with less effective regulation. Copyright 2011 Oxford University Press 2010 All rights reserved, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Kate Ivanova, 2011. "Corruption and air pollution in Europe," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 63(1), pages 49-70, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:63:y:2011:i:1:p:49-70
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpq017
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Per G. Fredriksson & Eric Neumayer, 2016. "Corruption and Climate Change Policies: Do the Bad Old Days Matter?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 63(2), pages 451-469, February.
    2. Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2013. "Economic Growth, Health, and the Choice of Polluting Technologies: The Role of Bureaucratic Corruption," Discussion Papers in Economics 13/22, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    3. repec:ijb:journl:v:16:y:2017:i:1:p:49-74 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Morakinyo Adetutu & Anthony Glass & Karligash Kenjegalieva & Robin Sickles, 2015. "The effects of efficiency and TFP growth on pollution in Europe: a multistage spatial analysis," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 307-326, June.
    5. Shouro Dasgupta & Enrica De Cian, 2016. "Institutions and the Environment: Existing Evidence and Future Directions," Working Papers 2016.41, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    6. Anthony J. Glass & Karligash Kenjegalieva & Robin Sickles, 2012. "The Effects of Efficiency and TFP Growth on Nitrogen and Sulphur Emissions in Europe: A Multistage Spatial Analysis," Discussion Paper Series 2012_11, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Oct 2012.
    7. Stefan Borsky & Esther Blanco, 2014. "Setting one voluntary standard in a heterogeneous Europe - EMAS, corruption and stringency of environmental regulations," Working Papers 2014-29, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    8. Eleni Stathopoulou & Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2013. "Corruption, Entry and Pollution," Discussion Papers in Economics 13/21, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    9. repec:eee:resene:v:50:y:2017:i:c:p:15-35 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Stefan Borsky & Paul A. Raschky, 2015. "Intergovernmental Interaction in Compliance with an International Environmental Agreement," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(2), pages 161-203.

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