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Personal Sector Money Demand in the UK

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  • Drake, Leigh
  • Chrystal, K Alec

Abstract

Nonparametric demand analysis is utilized to establish weakly separable subsets of monetary assets for the U.K. personal sector in the context of a utility function consisting of durable and nondurable consumption goods, services, leisure, and monetary assets. The admissible collections of assets are then combined using Divisia aggregation in order to produce monetary aggregates that are consistent with economic aggregation theory. The authors investigate the money demand properties of the aggregates and find relatively simple, stable long-run money-demand functions for the U.K. personal sector with well determined error correction dynamics. Copyright 1997 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Drake, Leigh & Chrystal, K Alec, 1997. "Personal Sector Money Demand in the UK," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(2), pages 188-206, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:49:y:1997:i:2:p:188-206
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    Cited by:

    1. Binner, Jane M. & Bissoondeeal, Rakesh K. & Elger, C. Thomas & Jones, Barry E. & Mullineux, Andrew W., 2009. "Admissible monetary aggregates for the euro area," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 99-114, February.
    2. Rayton, Bruce A. & Pavlyk, Khrystyna, 2010. "On the recent divergence between measures of the money supply in the UK," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 108(2), pages 159-162, August.
    3. Rakesh K. Bissoondeeal & Michail Karoglou & Alicia M. Gazely, 2011. "Forecasting The Uk/Us Exchange Rate With Divisia Monetary Models And Neural Networks," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 58(1), pages 127-152, February.
    4. Leigh Drake & Adrian Fleissig, 2004. "Admissible Monetary Aggregates and UK Inflation Targeting," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2004 2, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
    5. Jones, Barry E. & Stracca, Livio, 2006. "Are money and consumption additively separable in the euro area? A non-parametric approach," Working Paper Series 704, European Central Bank.
    6. K Alec Chrystal & Paul Mizen, 2001. "Consumption, money and lending: a joint model for the UK household sector," Bank of England working papers 134, Bank of England.
    7. Elger, Thomas, 2002. "The Demand for Monetary Assets in the UK; a Locally Flexible Demand System Analysis," Working Papers 2002:6, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    8. Alicia Gazely & Jane Binner & Graham Kendall, 2004. "Co-evolution vs. Neural Networks; An Evaluation of UK Risky Money," Computing in Economics and Finance 2004 258, Society for Computational Economics.
    9. Fleissig, Adrian R. & Whitney, Gerald A., 2008. "A nonparametric test of weak separability and consumer preferences," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 147(2), pages 275-281, December.
    10. K. Alec Chrystal & Paul Mizen, 2005. "Other financial corporations: Cinderella or ugly sister of empirical monetary economics?," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(1), pages 63-80.
    11. Jane M. Binner & Alicia M. Gazely & Shu-Heng Chen, 2002. "Financial innovation and Divisia monetary indices in Taiwan: a neural network approach," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 238-247, June.
    12. Binner, Jane & Elger, Thomas, 2002. "The UK Personal Sector Demand for Risky Money," Working Papers 2002:9, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    13. John Ashworth & David Barlow & Lynne Evans, 2014. "Sectoral Money Demand Behaviour and the Welfare Cost of Inflation in the UK," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 82(6), pages 732-750, December.
    14. Elger, Thomas & Jones, Barry & Edgerton, David & Binner, Jane, 2004. "The Optimal Level of Monetary Aggregation in the UK," Working Papers 2004:7, Lund University, Department of Economics, revised 26 Jan 2005.
    15. Obben, James & Nugroho, Agus Eko, 2003. "Determinants Of The Funding Volatility Of Indonesian Banks: A Dynamic Model," Discussion Papers 23700, Massey University, Department of Applied and International Economics.
    16. Rakesh Bissoondeeal & Michail Karoglou & Andy Mullineux, 2014. "Breaks in the UK Household Sector Money Demand Function," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 82, pages 47-68, December.
    17. Drake, Leigh & Fleissig, Adrian R., 2010. "Substitution between monetary assets and consumer goods: New evidence on the monetary transmission mechanism," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(11), pages 2811-2821, November.
    18. Binner, Jane & Elger, Thomas & de Peretti, Philipe, 2002. "Is UK Risky Money Weakly Separable? A Stochastic Approach," Working Papers 2002:13, Lund University, Department of Economics.

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