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Foreign Exchange Market Bid-Ask Spreads and the Market Price of Social Unrest

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  • Melvin, Michael
  • Tan, Kok-Hui

Abstract

Time-series evidence yields estimates of the increase in the spread on the South African rand on days when riots, demonstrations, armed attacks, and related deaths occur in South Africa. The cross-section evidence demonstrates how spreads vary across thirty-six industrial and developing countries as spot rate volatility and country risk vary. Both the changes in the spread over time for particular countries and the changes in the spread across the countries at a particular time appear to be significantly related to countries' risk differences and exchange-rate volatility. Copyright 1996 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Melvin, Michael & Tan, Kok-Hui, 1996. "Foreign Exchange Market Bid-Ask Spreads and the Market Price of Social Unrest," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 48(2), pages 329-341, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:48:y:1996:i:2:p:329-41
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    Cited by:

    1. Shang-Jin Wei, 1991. "Anticipations of foreign exchange volatility and bid-ask spreads," International Finance Discussion Papers 409, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. King, Michael R. & Osler, Carol L. & Rime, Dagfinn, 2013. "The market microstructure approach to foreign exchange: Looking back and looking forward," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 95-119.
    3. Khemraj, Tarron & Pasha, Sukrishnalall, 2008. "Foreign exchange market bid-ask spread and market power in an underdeveloped economy," MPRA Paper 11422, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Khemraj, Tarron & Pasha, Sukrishnalall, 2012. "Analysis of an unannounced foreign exchange regime change," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 145-157.
    5. Terry Boulter & Celeste Ping Fern Tan, 2000. "The Short Run Impact of Scheduled Macroeconomic Announcements on the Australian Dollar during 1998," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 082, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    6. Terry Boulter, 2000. "Asymmetric Information Arrival and the Short-Run Dynamics of Australian Dollar Volatility: a Mixture of Distributions Approach," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 073, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    7. Earl A. Thompson & Charles R. Hickson, 2006. "Predicting bubbles," Global Business and Economics Review, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 8(3/4), pages 217-246.
    8. Koutmos, Gregory & Martin, Anna D., 2011. "Currency bid-ask spread dynamics and the Asian crisis: Evidence across currency regimes," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 62-73, February.
    9. Earl A. Thompson & Jonathan Treussard & Charles R. Hickson, 2004. "Predicting Bubbles and Bubbles-Substitutes," UCLA Economics Working Papers 836, UCLA Department of Economics.
    10. Josef C. Brada & Ali M. Kutan & Taner M. Yigit, 2004. "The Effects of Transition and Political Instability On Foreign Direct Investment Inflows: Central Europe and the Balkans," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp729, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    11. Katusiime, Lorna & Shamsuddin, Abul & Agbola, Frank W., 2015. "Foreign exchange market efficiency and profitability of trading rules: Evidence from a developing country," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 315-332.
    12. Balvers, Ronald & Wu, Yangru, 2010. "Optimal transaction filters under transitory trading opportunities: Theory and empirical illustration," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 129-156, February.
    13. Kubo, Koji, 2015. "Transition from black to official markets for foreign exchange in Myanmar," IDE Discussion Papers 511, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    14. Ali Kutan & Su Zhou, 1995. "Sociopolitical instability, volatility, and the bid-ask spread: Evidence from the free market for dollars in Poland," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 225-236, July.

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