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Farm/Non-farm Growth Linkages in Zambia

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  • Hazell, Peter B R
  • Hojjati, Behjat

Abstract

This paper uses farm survey data from Eastern Province, Zambia to show that regional income multipliers arming from agricultural growth may be stronger than previously thought for Sub-Saharan Africa. However, the growth multipliers are driven primarily by household consumption demands) and they arise largely within the agricultural sector itself because of strong marginal budget shares for nontradable foods. Policies and investments to promote the supply response and local marketing of nontradable foods could greatly enhance the income and employment impacts of agricultural growth. Copyright 1995 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Hazell, Peter B R & Hojjati, Behjat, 1995. "Farm/Non-farm Growth Linkages in Zambia," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 4(3), pages 406-435, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:4:y:1995:i:3:p:406-35
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    Cited by:

    1. Jean-Paul Chavas & Ragan Petrie & Michael Roth, 2005. "Farm Household Production Efficiency: Evidence from The Gambia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(1), pages 160-179.
    2. Ministry of Agriculture (Liberia), . "Comprehensive Assessment of the Agriculture Sector in Liberia : Volume 1, Synthesis Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies, The World Bank, number 7677, March.
    3. Anik, Asif Reza & Bauer, Siegfried, 2015. "Impact of resource ownership and input market access on Bangladeshi paddy growers’ efficiency," International Journal of Agricultural Management, Institute of Agricultural Management, vol. 4(3), April.
    4. Delgado, Christopher L. & Hopkins, Jane & Kelly , Valerie & Hazell, P. B. R. & McKenna, Anna A. & Gruhn, Peter & Hojjati, Behjat & Sil, Jayashree & Courbois, Claude, 1998. "Agricultural growth linkages in Sub-Saharan Africa:," Research reports 107, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Poulton, Colin & Davies, Rob & Matshe, Innocent & Urey, Ian, 2002. "A Review Of Zimbabwe'S Agricultural Economic Policies: 1980 - 2000," ADU Working Papers 10922, Imperial College at Wye, Department of Agricultural Sciences.
    6. Adebayo Shittu, 2014. "Off-farm labour supply and production efficiency of farm household in rural Southwest Nigeria," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-21, December.
    7. Islam, Nurul, 1997. "The nonfarm sector and rural development: review of issues and evidence," 2020 vision discussion papers 22, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Gavin Hilson & Chris Garforth, 2012. "‘Agricultural Poverty’ and the Expansion of Artisanal Mining in Sub-Saharan Africa: Experiences from Southwest Mali and Southeast Ghana," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(3), pages 435-464, June.
    9. McCulloch, Neil, 2003. "The impact of structural reforms on poverty : a simple methodology with extensions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3124, The World Bank.

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