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Firm-level knowledge accumulation and regional dynamics

Author

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  • Marjolein C. J. Caniels
  • Henny A. Romijn

Abstract

Two literatures have contributed to our insight into the determinants of economic growth. Regional agglomeration studies emphasize the favourable impact of geographical proximity on performance. However, the firms that constitute those agglomerations largely remain black boxes. In contrast, studies about technological learning explain economic performance at the firm level without systematically taking account of proximity effects. This paper proposes a possible way of bridging this gap by fusing elements from both partial literatures into an integrated framework. Its value added is illustrated with an empirical example. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Marjolein C. J. Caniels & Henny A. Romijn, 2003. "Firm-level knowledge accumulation and regional dynamics," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(6), pages 1253-1278, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:12:y:2003:i:6:p:1253-1278
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Morrison & Carlo Pietrobelli & Roberta Rabellotti, 2008. "Global Value Chains and Technological Capabilities: A Framework to Study Learning and Innovation in Developing Countries," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 39-58.
    2. Angela Rocio Vasquez-Urriago & Andrés Barge-Gil & Aurelia Modrego Rico, 2016. "Which firms benefit more from being located in a Science and Technology Park? Empirical evidence for Spain," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(1), pages 107-117.
    3. Squicciarini, Mariagrazia, 2009. "Science parks, knowledge spillovers, and firms' innovative performance: evidence from Finland," Economics Discussion Papers 2009-32, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    4. Kesidou, Effie & Romijn, Henny, 2008. "Do Local Knowledge Spillovers Matter for Development? An Empirical Study of Uruguay's Software Cluster," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 2004-2028, October.
    5. Eleonora Lorenzini, 2012. "Innovation and e-commerce in clusters of small firms: The case of a regional e-marketplace," DEM Working Papers Series 003, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
    6. Elisa Giuliani, 2004. "Laggard Clusters as Slow Learners, Emerging Clusters as Locus of Knowledge Cohesion (and Exclusion): A Comparative Study in the Wine Industry," LEM Papers Series 2004/09, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    7. Koschatzky, Knut & Baier, Elisabeth & Kroll, Henning & Stahlecker, Thomas, 2009. "The spatial multidimensionality of sectoral innovation: the case of information and communication technologies," Working Papers "Firms and Region" R4/2009, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    8. Coronado, Daniel & Acosta, Manuel & Fernández, Ana, 2008. "Attitudes to innovation in peripheral economic regions," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(6-7), pages 1009-1021, July.
    9. Andrea Morrison & Carlo Pietrobelli & Roberta Rabellotti, 2006. "Global Value Chains and Technological Capabilities: A Framework to Study Industrial Innovation in Developing Countries," KITeS Working Papers 192, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Dec 2006.

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