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To the manor born: a new microlevel wage database for eighteenth-century Denmark
[Trends in real wages in Denmark since the late Middle Ages]

Author

Listed:
  • Peter Sandholt Jensen
  • Cristina Victoria Radu
  • Paul Sharp

Abstract

We document and make available to the scholarly community a uniquely detailed database of 20,680 observations of wages for men, women, and children and 30,000 observations of prices from eighteenth-century rural Denmark. These microlevel data were originally collected by the Danish Price History Project but have not previously been released. To illustrate the usefulness of such data, we discuss possible applications.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Sandholt Jensen & Cristina Victoria Radu & Paul Sharp, 2022. "To the manor born: a new microlevel wage database for eighteenth-century Denmark [Trends in real wages in Denmark since the late Middle Ages]," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(2), pages 302-310.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ereveh:v:26:y:2022:i:2:p:302-310.
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    References listed on IDEAS

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