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Critical masses in the decollectivisation of post-Soviet agriculture

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  • Martin Petrick
  • Michael R. Carter

Abstract

Decollectivisation in post-Soviet agriculture has generally been slow except for islands of complete individualisation. Our model interlinks two types of critical mass phenomena that can explain these outcomes. First, positive network externalities reshape decollectivisation incentives after a sufficient number of reform pioneers shift to private farming. Second, workers have preferences for behaving in conformity with their social reference group. This allows collective farm managers interested in cementing their own power to manipulate reference groups by limiting workers' horizons. We provide empirical support with a threshold regression based on a unique data set of regional reform outcomes in Moldova. Oxford University Press and Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics 2009; all rights reserved. For permissions, please email journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Petrick & Michael R. Carter, 2009. "Critical masses in the decollectivisation of post-Soviet agriculture," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 36(2), pages 231-252, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:erevae:v:36:y:2009:i:2:p:231-252
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/erae/jbp022
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    Cited by:

    1. Petrick, Martin & Wandel, Jürgen & Karsten, Katharina, 2013. "Rediscovering the Virgin Lands: Agricultural investment and rural livelihoods in a Eurasian frontier area," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 164-179.
    2. Petrick, Martin, 2010. "Zur institutionellen Steuerbarkeit von produktivem Unternehmertum im Transformationsprozess Russlands
      [On institutional reforms and the allocation of entrepreneurship In Russia’s transition]
      ," IAMO Discussion Papers 132, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO).
    3. Petrick, Martin & Wandel, Jürgen & Karsten, Katharina, 2011. "Farm restructuring and agricultural recovery in Kazakhstan's grain region: An update," IAMO Discussion Papers 137, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO).

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