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Consumer response to a food safety incident: exploring the role of supplier differentiation in an experimental study

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  • Andreas B–cker

Abstract

Differentiation between suppliers with respect to reliability is tested as a determinant of consumer response to a food scare in an experimental pilot study. The theory-based prediction that rising levels of differentiation increase the loss in consumer trust after a food scare is not supported by the data. Rather than the theoretically derived variables, three other variables are found to influence individual response to a food safety incident significantly. These are gender, personal experience with a food poisoning, and the subject's impression of the authenticity of the information provided in the experiment. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas B–cker, 2002. "Consumer response to a food safety incident: exploring the role of supplier differentiation in an experimental study," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 29-50, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:erevae:v:29:y:2002:i:1:p:29-50
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    Cited by:

    1. Goldsmith, Peter D. & Turan, Nesve A. & Gow, Hamish R., 2004. "Firms, Incentives, And The Supply Of Food Safety: A Formal Model Of Government Enforcement," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20343, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Mazzocchi, Mario & Lobb, Alexandra E. & Traill, W. Bruce, 2006. "Food Scares and Consumer Behaviour: A European Perspective," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25613, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Lobb, Alexandra E., 2004. "A Methodological Review of the Impacts of Risk and Trust on Consumer Behaviour Towards Food Safety," 84th Seminar, February 8-11, 2004, Zeist, The Netherlands 24994, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Harsche, Johannes, 2006. "Räumlich Differenzierte Stabilisierungswirkungen Der Europäischen Agrarpolitik In Unterschiedlich Konditionierten Erzeugerregionen In Hessen," 46th Annual Conference, Giessen, Germany, October 4-6, 2006 14949, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    5. Wiegerinck, V.J.J., 2006. "Consumer trust and food safety. An attributional approach to food safety incidents and channel response," Other publications TiSEM 6853c430-a9ce-434f-8d45-b, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    6. Mazzocchi, Mario & Lobb, Alexandra E. & Traill, W. Bruce, 2006. "THE SPARTA Model: An Econometric Analysis of Consumer Behaviour under Risk," 99th Seminar, February 8-10, 2006, Bonn, Germany 7763, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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