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The Spatial Distribution of Black Employment between the Central City and the Suburbs

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  • Ihlanfeldt, Keith R
  • Young, Madelyn V

Abstract

The share of fast-food restaurant jobs held by blacks is smaller in the suburbs than in the central city. This is of interest because expected wages are higher in the suburbs. Estimating a model of the racial composition of the restaurant's workforce, the authors find that 36 percent of the difference in black employment share between central city and suburban firms is attributable to the fact that suburban firms are less frequently served by public transit. City/suburban differences in the race of managers and customers also play an important role, accounting for 29 percent of the difference. Copyright 1996 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Ihlanfeldt, Keith R & Young, Madelyn V, 1996. "The Spatial Distribution of Black Employment between the Central City and the Suburbs," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(4), pages 693-707, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:34:y:1996:i:4:p:693-707
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ariél Pakes & Zvi Griliches, 1984. "Estimating Distributed Lags in Short Panels with an Application to the Specification of Depreciation Patterns and Capital Stock Constructs," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(2), pages 243-262.
    2. Epstein, L. & Denny, M., 1980. "Endogenous capital utilization in a short-run production model : Theory and an empiral application," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 189-207, February.
    3. W. Erwin Diewert, 1980. "Aggregation Problems in the Measurement of Capital," NBER Chapters,in: The Measurement of Capital, pages 433-538 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Kim, Moshe, 1988. "The Structure of Technology with Endogenous Capital Utilization," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 29(1), pages 111-130, February.
    5. J. Bradford De Long & Lawrence H. Summers, 1991. "Equipment Investment and Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 445-502.
    6. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1982. "Time to Build and Aggregate Fluctuations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(6), pages 1345-1370, November.
    7. Prucha, Ingmar R. & Nadiri, M. Ishaq, 1996. "Endogenous capital utilization and productivity measurement in dynamic factor demand models Theory and an application to the U.S. electrical machinery industry," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1-2), pages 343-379.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Steven Raphael & Michael A. Stoll, 2000. "Can Boosting Minority Car-Ownership Rates Narrow Inter-Racial Employment Gaps," JCPR Working Papers 200, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    2. Laurent Gobillon & Harris Selod & Yves Zenou, 2007. "The Mechanisms of Spatial Mismatch," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 44(12), pages 2401-2427, November.
    3. Ihlanfeldt, Keith R., 1997. "Information on the Spatial Distribution of Job Opportunities within Metropolitan Areas," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 218-242, March.
    4. Holzer, Harry J & Raphael, Steven & Stoll, Michael A, 2006. "Perceived Criminality, Criminal Background Checks, and the Racial Hiring Practices of Employers," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(2), pages 451-480, October.
    5. Raphael, Steven & Stoll, Michael A. & Holzer, Harry J., 2000. "Are Suburban Firms More Likely to Discriminate against African-Americans?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, pages 485-508.
    6. Harry J. Holzer & John M. Quigley & Steven Raphael, 2003. "Public transit and the spatial distribution of minority employment: Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 415-441.
    7. repec:kap:iaecre:v:6:y:2000:i:1:p:113-119 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Harry J. Holzer & Keith R. Ihlanfeldt, 1996. "Spatial factors and the employment of blacks at the firm level," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue May, pages 65-86.
    9. Harry J. Holzer & Steven Raphael & Michael A. Stoll, 2001. "Will Employers Hire Ex-Offenders? Employer Preferences, Background Checks, and Their Determinants," JCPR Working Papers 238, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    10. William Levernier & Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 2000. "The Causes of Regional Variations in U.S. Poverty: A Cross-County Analysis," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(3), pages 473-497.
    11. William Gissy, 2000. "Race and wages in the metro Atlanta fast food industry," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 6(1), pages 113-119, February.
    12. Stoll, Michael A., 1999. "Spatial Job Search, Spatial Mismatch, and the Employment and Wages of Racial and Ethnic Groups in Los Angeles," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 129-155, July.
    13. Ana Regina Vides de Andrade & Anabella Lardé de Palomo & Lissette Calderón Martínez, 2002. "Geographical Exclusion in Rural Areas of El Salvador: Its Impact on Labor Market Outcomes," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 3275, Inter-American Development Bank.
    14. H. J. Holzer, "undated". "Employer skill needs and labor market outcome by race and gender," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1087-96, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.

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