IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/cjrecs/v10y2017i3p559-573..html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Practice running ahead of theory? Political economy and the economic lessons of UK devolution

Author

Listed:
  • Graham Brownlow

Abstract

Advocates of political decentralisation make much of its supposed ‘economic dividends’. Critics of this argument, while acknowledging the possible benefits, suggest that the specific ‘institutional geography’ under which devolution operates is crucial. In short, the Institutionalist critique is that economic outcomes are contingent on the way devolved institutions are designed. The institutional geography of contemporary UK devolution, as well as the historical case of Northern Irish devolution (1920–1972), is analysed in this article. Contemporary and historical evidence, as well as theoretical material presented, provides further support for the hypothesis that institutional structures are crucial.

Suggested Citation

  • Graham Brownlow, 2017. "Practice running ahead of theory? Political economy and the economic lessons of UK devolution," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 10(3), pages 559-573.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cjrecs:v:10:y:2017:i:3:p:559-573.
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cjres/rsx015
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ben Gardiner & Ron Martin & Peter Sunley & Peter Tyler, 2013. "Spatially unbalanced growth in the British economy," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(6), pages 889-928, November.
    2. R. Ross Mackay, 2003. "Twenty-five Years of Regional Development," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 303-317.
    3. Graham Brownlow, 2007. "The causes and consequences of rent‐seeking in Northern Ireland, 1945–721," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 60(1), pages 70-96, February.
    4. Michael Keaney & Alan Hutton, 2000. "Devolved Politics in a Globalizing Economy: The Economic Significance of the Scottish Parliament," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 463-470, June.
    5. Andres Rodriguez-Pose & Nicholas Gill, 2005. "On the 'economic dividend' of devolution," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(4), pages 405-420.
    6. Hamlin, Alan P, 1991. "Decentralization, Competition and the Efficiency of Federalism," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 67(198), pages 193-204, September.
    7. Andy Pike & Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & John Tomaney & Gianpiero Torrisi & Vassilis Tselios, 2010. "In Search of the 'Economic Dividend' of Devolution: Spatial Disparities, Spatial Economic Policy and Decentralisation in the UK," SERC Discussion Papers 0062, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    8. Kaldor, Nicholas, 1970. "The Case for Regional Policies," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 17(3), pages 337-348, November.
    9. Rowthorn, Bob, 1981. "Northern Ireland: An Economy in Crisis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 1-31, March.
    10. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416-416.
    11. Esmond Birnie & Graham Brownlow, 2017. "Should the fiscal powers of the Northern Ireland Assembly be enhanced?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(9), pages 1429-1439, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Graham Brownlow & Esmond Birnie, 2018. "Rebalancing and Regional Economic Performance: Northern Ireland in A Nordic Mirror," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(1), pages 58-73, February.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Torrisi, Gianpiero & Pike, Andy & Tomaney, John & Tselios, Vassilis, 2011. "(Re-)exploring the link between devolution and regional disparities in Italy," MPRA Paper 32212, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. ., 2014. "Devolution, city governance and economic performance," Chapters, in: Urban Economics and Urban Policy, chapter 7, pages 157-184, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Roberto Ezcurra & Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, 2017. "Does ethnic segregation matter for spatial inequality?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(6), pages 1149-1178.
    4. Pike, Andy & Rodríguez-Pose, Andrés & Torrisi, Gianpiero & Tselios, Vassilis & Tomaney, John, 2010. "In search of the ‘economic dividend’ of devolution: spatial disparities, spatial economic policy and decentralisation in the UK," DEMQ Working Paper Series 2010/9, University of Catania, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    5. Minyan Zhu & Antonio Peyrache, 2017. "The quality and efficiency of public service delivery in the UK and China," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(2), pages 285-296, February.
    6. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Roberto Ezcurra, 2011. "Is fiscal decentralization harmful for economic growth? Evidence from the OECD countries," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(4), pages 619-643, July.
    7. Fidel Perez-Sebastian & Ohad Raveh, 2016. "The Natural Resource Curse and Fiscal Decentralization," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 98(1), pages 212-230.
    8. Tarkan Cavusoglu & Oguzhan Dincer, 2015. "Does decentralization reduce income inequality? Only in rich states," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 285-306, July.
    9. Seabright, Paul, 1996. "Accountability and decentralisation in government: An incomplete contracts model," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 61-89, January.
    10. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Roberto Ezcurra, 2010. "Does decentralization matter for regional disparities? A cross-country analysis," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(5), pages 619-644, September.
    11. Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Santiago Lago-Peñas & Agnese Sacchi, 2017. "The Impact Of Fiscal Decentralization: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(4), pages 1095-1129, September.
    12. Luis Diaz‐Serrano & Andrés Rodríguez‐Pose, 2012. "Decentralization, Subjective Well‐Being, and the Perception of Institutions," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(2), pages 179-193, May.
    13. Diaz-Serrano, Luis & Rodriguez-Pose, Andres, 2011. "Decentralization, Happiness, and the Perception of Institutions," CEPR Discussion Papers 8356, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Luis Diaz-Serrano & Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, 2015. "Decentralization and the Welfare State: What Do Citizens Perceive?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 120(2), pages 411-435, January.
    15. Andrés Rodríguez‐Pose & Anne Krøijer, 2009. "Fiscal Decentralization and Economic Growth in Central and Eastern Europe," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(3), pages 387-417, September.
    16. Graham Brownlow & Esmond Birnie, 2018. "Rebalancing and Regional Economic Performance: Northern Ireland in A Nordic Mirror," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(1), pages 58-73, February.
    17. Muringani, Jonathan & Dahl Fitjar, Rune & Rodríguez-Pose, Andrés, 2019. "Decentralisation, quality of government and economic growth in the regions of the EU," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 91023, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    18. Muhammad Shahid & Amjad Ali, 2015. "The Impact of Decentralized Economic Affairs Expenditures on Economic Growth: A Time Series Analysis of Pakistan," Bulletin of Business and Economics (BBE), Research Foundation for Humanity (RFH), vol. 4(3), pages 136-148, September.
    19. Torrisi, Gianpiero & Pike, Andy & Tomaney, John & Tselios, Vassilis, 2011. "Defining and measuring decentralisation: a critical review," MPRA Paper 51441, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Petr Janský & Miroslav Palanský, 2016. "Fiscal decentralization and the shadow economy," WIDER Working Paper Series 172, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:cjrecs:v:10:y:2017:i:3:p:559-573.. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Oxford University Press to update the entry or send us the correct email address or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: https://academic.oup.com/cjres .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.