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The Feminist Challenge to Neoclassical Economics

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  • Woolley, Frances R

Abstract

This paper describes a feminist research agenda within economics, how some of the research priorities have been accommodated within neoclassical economics, and how others fundamentally challenge the neoclassical economic paradigm. There are three major challenges to neoclassical economics raised by feminists. First, women are invisible in much economic analysis and this situation needs to be remedied. Second, tests may be affected by educational, social, and economic institutions. We need a feminist model of endogenous preferences and to incorporate the endogeneity of preferences into welfare economic analysis and policy recommendations. Finally, institutional structures matter and deserve careful analysis. (c) 1993 Academic Press, Inc. Copyright 1993 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Woolley, Frances R, 1993. "The Feminist Challenge to Neoclassical Economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(4), pages 485-500, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:17:y:1993:i:4:p:485-500
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    Cited by:

    1. GRABKA Markus & MARCUS Jan & SIERMINSKA Eva, 2013. "Wealth distribution within couples and financial decision making," LISER Working Paper Series 2013-02, LISER.
    2. Martha MacDonald, 1998. "Gender and Social Security Policy: Pitfalls and Possibilities," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 1-25.
    3. Mónica Guillén Royo, 2003. "Hacia una revisión crítica del análisis neoclásico del consumo: una alternativa basada en las necesidades," Revista de Economía Crítica, Asociación de Economía Crítica, vol. 1, pages 95-111.
    4. Gillian Hewitson, 2001. "A Survey of Feminist Economics," Working Papers 2001.01, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
    5. Jane Hall, 1997. ""Unorthodox, troublesome, dangerous and disobedient": a feminist perspective on health economics, CHERE Discussion Paper No 33," Discussion Papers 33, CHERE, University of Technology, Sydney.
    6. Markus Grabka & Jan Marcus & Eva Sierminska, 2015. "Wealth distribution within couples," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 459-486, September.
    7. Lucie Schmidt & Purvi Sevak, 2006. "Gender, Marriage, And Asset Accumulation In The United States," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1-2), pages 139-166.
    8. Elke Holst & Anne Busch, 2009. "Der "Gender Pay Gap" in Führungspositionen der Privatwirtschaft in Deutschland," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 169, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    9. Eva M. Sierminska & Joachim R. Frick & Markus M. Grabka, 2008. "Examining the Gender Wealth Gap in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 115, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Shelley A. Phipps & Peter S. Burton, 1996. "Collective Models of Family Behaviour: Implications for Economic Policy," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 22(2), pages 129-143, June.
    11. Ellen Mutari & Deborah Figart & Marilyn Power, 2001. "Implicit Wage Theories in Equal Pay Debates in the United States," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(2), pages 23-52.
    12. Shelley Phipps & Peter Burton & Lars Osberg, 2001. "Time as a Source of Inequality Within Marriage: Are Husbands More Satisfied With Time for Themselves than Wives?," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(2), pages 1-21.
    13. Shelley Phipps, "undated". "Economics and Well-Being of Canadian Children," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 35, McMaster University.

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