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The ICT Productivity Paradox: Insights from Micro Data


  • Dirk Pilat


Empirical analysis of the economic impacts of information and communications technology (ICT) has followed three main tracks, namely analysis with aggregate data on ICT investment, with data on ICTproducing and ICT-using industries, and with firm-level data. Firm-level data point to factors influencing the impacts of ICT that cannot be observed at the aggregate level, e.g. organisational factors or the availability of skills. Firm-level data can also point to competitive effects that may accompany the spread...

Suggested Citation

  • Dirk Pilat, 2005. "The ICT Productivity Paradox: Insights from Micro Data," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2004(1), pages 37-65.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:ecokaa:5lgxvrhfzd31

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cho, Youngsang & Lee, Jongsu & Kim, Tai-Yoo, 2007. "The impact of ICT investment and energy price on industrial electricity demand: Dynamic growth model approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 4730-4738, September.
    2. Tomi Kyyrä & Mika Maliranta, 2008. "The micro-level dynamics of declining labour share: lessons from the Finnish great leap ," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(6), pages 1147-1172, December.
    3. Carolina Castaldi & Giovanni Dosi, 2008. "Technical Change and Economic Growth: Some Lessons from Secular Patterns and Some Conjectures on the Current Impact of ICT Technology," LEM Papers Series 2008/01, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    4. Ioannis Giotopoulos & Georgios Fotopoulos, 2010. "Intra-Industry Growth Dynamics in the Greek Services Sector: Firm-Level Estimates for ICT-Producing, ICT-Using, and Non-ICT Industries," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 36(1), pages 59-74, February.
    5. Concetta Castiglione, 2012. "Technical efficiency and ICT investment in Italian manufacturing firms," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(14), pages 1749-1763, May.
    6. Maliranta, Mika & Asplund, Rita, 2007. "Training and Hiring Strategies to Improve Firm Performance," Discussion Papers 1105, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    7. Raspe, Otto & van Oort, Frank G., 2011. "Firm heterogeneity, productivity and spatially bounded knowledge externalities," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 38-47, March.
    8. Böhringer, Christoph & Moslener, Ulf & Oberndorfer, Ulrich & Ziegler, Andreas, 2012. "Clean and productive? Empirical evidence from the German manufacturing industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 442-451.
    9. Kyyrä, Tomi & Maliranta, Mika, 2006. "The Micro-level Dynamics of Declining Labour Share: Lessons from Finnish Great Leap," Discussion Papers 1049, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    10. Carolina Castaldi & Giovanni Dosi, 2010. "Technical Change and Economic Growth: Some Lessons from Secular Patterns and Some Conjectures on the Current Impact of ICT," Chapters,in: Innovation and Economic Development, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. Giovanni Dosi & Sébastien Lechevalier & Angelo Secchi, 2010. "Interfirm heterogeneity: nature, sources and consequences for industrial dynamics. An introduction," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00642680, HAL.
    12. FUKAO Kyoji & IKEUCHI Kenta & YoungGak KIM & KWON Hyeog Ug, 2015. "Why Was Japan Left Behind in the ICT Revolution?," Discussion papers 15043, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    13. Richard Dion & Robert Fay, 2008. "Understanding Productivity: A Review of Recent Technical Research," Discussion Papers 08-3, Bank of Canada.

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