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Non-response and population representation in studies of adolescent time use


  • Casey B. Mulligan

    () (The University of Chicago)

  • Barbara Schneider

    () (The University of Chicago)

  • Rustin Wolfe

    () (Department of Education, St. Mary’s University of Minnesota)


Researchers have debated which methods are most valid and reliable for studying time use. One key instrument for measuring time use is the time diary, which has unique analytic properties that, if not adjusted for, can bias estimates. To assess sampling and non-response bias and potential under- or overreports of various activities, we use three different datasets to compare adolescents’ time use. Results of these comparisons are used to show how investigators can statistically adjust time use data to obtain more accurate estimates of time spent in various activities.

Suggested Citation

  • Casey B. Mulligan & Barbara Schneider & Rustin Wolfe, 2005. "Non-response and population representation in studies of adolescent time use," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 2(1), pages 33-53, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:leu:journl:2005:vol2:p33-53

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jonathan Gershuny & John Robinson, 1988. "Historical changes in the household division of labor," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 25(4), pages 537-552, November.
    2. Ragni Kitterød, 2001. "Does the recording of parallel activities in Time Use Diaries affect the way people report their main activities?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 56(2), pages 145-178, November.
    3. Juster, F Thomas & Stafford, Frank P, 1991. "The Allocation of Time: Empirical Findings, Behavioral Models, and Problems of Measurement," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 471-522, June.
    4. Suzanne Bianchi, 2000. "Maternal employment and time with children: Dramatic change or surprising continuity?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 37(4), pages 401-414, November.
    5. C. Russell Hill & Frank P. Stafford, 1980. "Parental Care of Children: Time Diary Estimates of Quantity, Predictability, and Variety," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 15(2), pages 219-239.
    6. Zick, Cathleen D, 2002. "Clocking the Progress in Time Use Research: Review Article," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(3), pages 435-442, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Deal, David, 2008. "Time for play – An exploratory analysis of the changing consumption contexts of digital games," MPRA Paper 11655, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Barbara Schneider, 2009. "Method Differences in Measuring Working Families’ Time," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 93(1), pages 105-110, August.

    More about this item


    Methodology for collecting; estimating; and organizing microeconomic data; correcting for sampling and non-response bias; comparing survey and ESM measures of time use;

    JEL classification:

    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access


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