IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kob/tjrevi/dec2011v1p30-60.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Empirical Analysis on the Dividend Life-Cycle Theory: Evidence from Japan

Author

Listed:
  • Hiroyuki Ishikawa

    (Graduate School of Business, Osaka City University, Japan)

Abstract

This paper aims to clarify a characteristic of the dividend policies of Japanese firms by verifying the dividend life-cycle theory. The analysis revealed that in Japan, growing firms choose further dividend increases compared to mature firms, and that such dividend increases by the growing firms are appreciated by the market more than those by the mature firms. These findings are not consistent with the prediction by the dividend life-cycle theory, but can be interpreted using the concept of corroboration effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Hiroyuki Ishikawa, 2011. "Empirical Analysis on the Dividend Life-Cycle Theory: Evidence from Japan," The Japanese Accounting Review, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University, vol. 1, pages 39-60, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kob:tjrevi:dec2011:v:1:p:30-60
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.rieb.kobe-u.ac.jp/tjar/article/vol1/pdf/3.Ishikawa.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eugene F. Fama & Kenneth R. French, 2001. "Disappearing Dividends: Changing Firm Characteristics Or Lower Propensity To Pay?," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 14(1), pages 67-79.
    2. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    3. DeAngelo, Harry & DeAngelo, Linda & Stulz, Rene M., 2006. "Dividend policy and the earned/contributed capital mix: a test of the life-cycle theory," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 227-254, August.
    4. Brav, Alon & Graham, John R. & Harvey, Campbell R. & Michaely, Roni, 2005. "Payout policy in the 21st century," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(3), pages 483-527, September.
    5. Louis T. W. Cheng & T. Y. Leung, 2006. "Revisiting the corroboration effects of earnings and dividend announcements," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 46(2), pages 221-241.
    6. Jensen, Michael C, 1986. "Agency Costs of Free Cash Flow, Corporate Finance, and Takeovers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 323-329, May.
    7. Pettit, R Richardson, 1972. "Dividend Announcements, Security Performance, and Capital Market Efficiency," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 27(5), pages 993-1007, December.
    8. Collins, Daniel W. & Maydew, Edward L. & Weiss, Ira S., 1997. "Changes in the value-relevance of earnings and book values over the past forty years," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 39-67, December.
    9. DeAngelo, Harry & DeAngelo, Linda & Skinner, Douglas J., 2000. "Special dividends and the evolution of dividend signaling," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 309-354, September.
    10. Kane, Alex & Lee, Young Ki & Marcus, Alan, 1984. " Earnings and Dividend Announcements: Is There a Corroboration Effect?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1091-1099, September.
    11. Lie, Erik, 2000. "Excess Funds and Agency Problems: An Empirical Study of Incremental Cash Disbursements," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 13(1), pages 219-247.
    12. Brandon Julio & David L. Ikenberry, 2004. "Reappearing Dividends," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 16(4), pages 89-100.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Dividend Life-Cycle Theory; Dividend Policy; Corroboration Effect; Signaling; Earnings Predictability;

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G35 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Payout Policy
    • M41 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Accounting - - - Accounting

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kob:tjrevi:dec2011:v:1:p:30-60. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (TJAR Editorial Office). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/rikobjp.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.