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Legislative influences in Japanese budgetary politics

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  • Steven Meyer
  • Shigeto Naka

Abstract

Following World War II (W.W.II), Japan adopted a democratic parliamentary system. Since its formation in 1955 the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) had monopolized Japanese legislature (Diet) for over 35 years. However, it is said that at the center of the budgetary process was the Ministry of Finance (MOF). Elite bureaucrats rather than politicians are typically seen as the agenda-setter. The action of politicians, in particular members of the LDP, to influence the budgetary resource allocation has been largely unexamined. This paper empirically examines the influence of the LDP on the supplementary budget formation and on the revenue-sharing. We find that the LDP had a significant impact on the budget formation. Further, we find that the LDP manipulated transfers from the central government to local governments presumably to maintain its electoral positions. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Suggested Citation

  • Steven Meyer & Shigeto Naka, 1998. "Legislative influences in Japanese budgetary politics," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 94(3), pages 267-288, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:94:y:1998:i:3:p:267-288
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1017969226540
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    Cited by:

    1. Eiji Yamamura & Yoshiro Tsutsui & Fumio Ohtake, 2015. "Relative income position and happiness: are cabinet supporters different from others in Japan?," ISER Discussion Paper 0921, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    2. Daiji Kawaguchi & Fumio Ohtake & Keiko Tamada, 2005. "The Productivity of Public Capital: Evidence from the 1994 Electoral Reform of Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 0627, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    3. Kozo Harimaya & Koichi Kagitani & Hirofumi Tominaga, 2010. "Political Economy Of Government Spending For Trade Liberalization: Politics Of Agriculture Related Government Spending For The Uruguay Round In Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 61(2), pages 159-174.
    4. Steven A. Meyer & Shigeto Naka, 1999. "The Determinants Of Japanese Local-Benefit Seeking," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 17(1), pages 87-96, January.
    5. Masami Imai, 2009. "Political Determinants of Government Loans in Japan," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(1), pages 41-70, February.
    6. Ian Lienert, 2005. "Who Controls the Budget; The Legislature or the Executive?," IMF Working Papers 05/115, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Kawaguchi, Daiji & Ohtake, Fumio & Tamada, Keiko, 2009. "The productivity of public capital: Evidence from Japan's 1994 electoral reform," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 332-343, September.

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