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Public Choice and the EPA: Empirical Evidence on Carbon Emissions Violations

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  • Mixon, Franklin G, Jr

Abstract

This study provides evidence of public choice determinants of the penalties assessed by the Environmental Protection Agency for carbon emissions violations. Following the work of Stigler (1971), Peltzman (1976), Tollison (1982), and Tullock (1989), this study points out that powerful business interest groups are able to use their political influence to shape EPA environmental policy for urban areas. The statistical estimates presented here suggest that business groups have limited power (through lobbying activity) in affecting the probability of the occurrence of an EPA citation for carbon emissions violations, while they may have considerable power in influencing the degree of an EPA citation for carbon emissions standards, once a citation occurs. Copyright 1995 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Mixon, Franklin G, Jr, 1995. "Public Choice and the EPA: Empirical Evidence on Carbon Emissions Violations," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 83(1-2), pages 127-137, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:83:y:1995:i:1-2:p:127-37
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Baik Kyung Hwan & Shogren Jason F., 1994. "Environmental Conflicts with Reimbursement for Citizen Suits," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 1-20, July.
    2. Arye L. Hillman & John G. Riley, 1989. "Politically Contestable Rents And Transfers," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 1(1), pages 17-39, March.
    3. Ellingsen, Tore, 1991. "Strategic Buyers and the Social Cost of Monopoly," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 648-657.
    4. Suen, Wing, 1989. "Rationing and Rent Dissipation in the Presence of Heterogeneous Individuals," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1384-1394, December.
    5. Hurley, Terrance M. & Shogren, Jason F., 1997. "Environmental Conflicts and the SLAPP," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 253-273, July.
    6. Baik, Kyung H & Shogren, Jason F, 1992. "Strategic Behavior in Contests: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 359-362, March.
    7. Dixit, Avinash K, 1987. "Strategic Behavior in Contests," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(5), pages 891-898, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joshua C. Hall & Christopher Shultz & E. Frank Stephenson, 2015. "The Political Economy of Local Fracking Bans," Working Papers 15-37, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    2. Bruce Yandle, 1999. "Public Choice at the Intersection of Environmental Law and Economics," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 5-27, July.
    3. Potters, Jan & Sloof, Randolph, 1996. "Interest groups: A survey of empirical models that try to assess their influence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 403-442, November.
    4. Correia, Maria M., 2014. "Political connections and SEC enforcement," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 241-262.

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