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Cultural Convergence in Historical Cultural Space-Time

  • Gordon Burt
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    How might we model the historical processes which transported Mozart's compositions in eighteenth century Vienna to their performance in twentieth century Japan? There is a need to look beyond the neo-classical economics tradition. A description is given of how cultural taste gives direction to cultural activity and how activities both use and create cultural taste and cultural capital. The role of social interaction is then introduced. In particular cultural convergence is explained in terms of a communication matrix. Finally the relationship between the communication matrix and locations in historical cultural space-time is examined. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1023/A:1007428016775
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Cultural Economics.

    Volume (Year): 21 (1997)
    Issue (Month): 4 (December)
    Pages: 291-305

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:21:y:1997:i:4:p:291-305
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